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Meeting of Council

 

Minutes

 

 

 

Tuesday 30 November 2021

 At 7.00pm

 

 

Council Chamber

Functions Centre

45 Princes Highway

Werribee

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

MINUTES

 

Meeting of Council HELD AT THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS, CIVIC CENTRE,

45 PRINCES HIGHWAY, WERRIBEE ON Tuesday 30 November 2021

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The meeting commenced at 7.00 pm.

 

PRESENT:                   Cr Jennie Barrera

Cr Josh Gilligan

Cr Adele Hegedich

Cr Jasmine Hill

Cr Marcel Mahfoud (virtual)

Cr Heather Marcus

Cr Peter Maynard

Cr Susan McIntyre

Cr Sahana Ramesh

Cr Mia Shaw

Cr Robert Szatkowski

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE:      Stephen Wall              Chief Executive Officer

                                      Ludo Campbell-Reid  Director City Design & Liveability

                                      Allison Kenwood         Director City Life

                                      Stephen Thorpe         Director City Operations

                                      Natalie Walker            Head of Strategy & Policy Impact

                                      Binda Gokhale           Chief Financial Officer

                                      Emily Keogh               Executive Manager Corporate Affairs

                                      Jenny Wood               Coordinator Governance

                                      Martina Simkin           A/Governance Policy & Projects Advisor

                                      Tammy Williamson     Executive Assistant to Chief Executive Officer

 

 

1.       OPENING PRAYER & WELCOME

The Mayor, Cr Peter Maynard, welcomed all in attendance to the meeting.

2.       APOLOGIES & REQUESTS FOR LEAVE

          Nil.

3.       DECLARATION BY COUNCILLORS OF DISCLOSURE OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST/CONFLICTING PERSONAL INTEREST IN ANY ITEM OF THE AGENDA

 

Cr Mia Shaw declared a general interest (private) in accordance with s127(2) in Item 6.5.6 Proposal for New Lease – Werribee Football Club – Non-Retail Lease Inclusion of Athlete’s Performance Hub.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.       CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING

 

MOTION:

 

Cr Robert Szatkowski / Susan McIntyre

 

That the minutes of the Council Meeting held on Wednesday, 26 October 2021, as prepared and circulated, be confirmed.

 

(CARRIED)

 

 

5.       Deputations and Presentations

Werribee River Association 40th Anniversary

Council wishes to acknowledge the Werribee River Association’s 40 Year Anniversary – which represents four decades of local volunteers working tirelessly to protect one of the City’s greatest natural assets. The Association was established in 1981 by a group of community members who were concerned about the degradation of the Werribee River. Over the years the Association has not only taken a hands-on approach to conserving the Werribee River catchment, but also advocates to all levels of Government whilst developing and contributing to key strategies that act to preserve the Werribee River.

Congratulations to the newly elected Board and Chairperson, Kathryn Williams and all past board members who have made such an outstanding contribution to our City through their work with the Werribee River Association.

 

6.       OFFICERS’ REPORTS

6.1              Petitions

6.1.1           Response to Petition 06-21 - Construction of Footpath on North Gateway                                                                                                                  4

6.2              Strategic Reports

6.2.1           Road Management Plan 2021                                                                         11

6.3              Policy/Advocacy

6.3.1           Invest in Opportunity - Federal Election Priorities                        60

6.4              Strategic & Town Planning

                   Nil.

6.5              Other Reports

6.5.1          Quarterly Community Report: Quarter 1 2021-22                                76

6.5.2           Financial Management Report - Quarter 1 - 2021/2022                     119

6.5.3           Response to Notice of Motion 607: Improving Library                       

                   services in Wyndham                                                                                     138

6.5.4           Naming of New Community Centres in Truganina South East and Tarneit North                                                                                                   175

6.5.5           Wyndham Accessibility Action Plan Year 2 Progress Report   181

6.5.6           Proposal for new lease - Werribee Football Club - Non-retail lease inclusion of Athlete's Performance Hub                                            189

6.5.7           Proposal to lease four (4) Council owned sites to early years partners for the delivery of kindergarten services                 196

6.5.8           Biannual Report of the Audit & Risk Committee                               207

6.5.9           Councillor Appointments to Committees                                           226

7.       Notices of Motion

7.1     Notice of Motion 613 - Wyndham Flower Festival                            240

7.2     Notice of Motion 614 - Advocacy for Wyndham Road Network Priorities                                                                                                            242

8.       Council Seal

8.1     Awarding of Contract - N400175 - Landfill Cell 4 Final Cap Construction                                                                                                   245

8.2     Resubmission of revised Instrument of Delegation from Council to Staff                                                                                                                     250

9.       QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE FROM PUBLIC GALLERY

   Nil.

 

10.     OTHER REPORTS

10.1  INTERNAL ARBITRATION DECISION                                                                 446

11.     URGENT BUSINESS 

12.     CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS

13.     CLOSE OF MEETING

 

        


Petitions

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.1.1

Director City Design & Liveability - Ludo Campbell-Reid

 

 

 

Response to Petition 06-21 - Construction of Footpath on North Gateway

 

Summary

On 18 October 2021, Council received a petition addressed to Wyndham City Council. The petition requested Wyndham City Council to reconsider the proposal to install a footpath on the west side of North Gateway, Wyndham Vale.

The petition was referred to Council’s City Transport Department to investigate. This report provides an update regarding this investigation.

 

Attachments

Nil

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Director City Design & Liveability - Ludo Campbell-Reid

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Traffic & Transport - Peter Fung

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·        Proposal to install a footpath on the west side of North Gateway, Wyndham Vale.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

1.       Notes the findings in this report.

2.       Request the CEO to support the construction of a footpath on the west side of North Gateway.

3.       Request the CEO to investigate whether it is warranted to install speed treatment(s) on/along North Gateway.

4.       Notify the lead petitioner accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOTION

 

CRS Mia Shaw / Heather Marcus

 

That Council:

1.       Notes the findings in this report.

2.       Request the CEO to support the construction of a footpath on the west side of North Gateway.

3.       Request the CEO to investigate whether it is warranted to install speed treatment(s) on/along North Gateway.

4.       Notify the lead petitioner accordingly.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

On 18 October 2021, Council received a petition addressed to Wyndham City Council. The petition requested Wyndham City Council to reconsider the proposal to install a footpath on the west side of North Gateway, Wyndham Vale.

The petition was referred to Council’s City Transport Department to investigate. This report provides an update regarding this investigation.

2.      Discussion

In September this year, Council sent a postcard to residents in North Gateway advising residents of our intention to build a footpath at this location. A footpath is proposed to be constructed in North Gateway as:

·    It is linked to a public transport route (bus).

·    It is located near pedestrian compatible destinations (school and reserve).

In October this year, Council received a petition objecting Council’s footpath proposal noting that:

·    The street already has a functional footpath on one side of the street with minimal foot traffic.

·    Another footpath will not provide any additional utility and will inflict negative repercussions to some households.

·    Council could instead address the growing problem of hooning and speeding along North Gateway by installing speed treatments.

Officers from City Transport investigated the petition. Please find below our recommendations/findings:

2.1 Speeding along North Gateway:

It is noted that funding is available from Council’s 2021/22 Road Safety Treatment budget to fund the installation of speed treatments to address speeding if warranted. 

Council officers will organise an investigation to take place to determine whether it is warranted to install speed treatment(s) at/along North Gateway. If the investigation identifies a speeding issue for this location, officers will develop designs for the installation of speed treatment(s) and implement accordingly.

2.2 Footpath:

It is noted that the petition states that there is minimal foot traffic on North Gateway. However, North Gateway is located near:

·    Wyndham Vale Primary School;

·    the Lollypop Creek reserve (and trail, and other local parks);

·    the Wyndham Vale Square shopping centre;

·    Bus Route 192 along Haines Dr; and

·    other community facilities.

It is also noted that the construction of a footpath is unlikely to inflict negative repercussions to the households in North Gateway. Of the 21 dwellings located on the west side, only 3 have any low-level landscaping within the road reserve that may require removal. There is evidence that some vehicle parking has occurred on the nature-strip, which is contrary to road rules (197) and local law (136).  However, the North Gateway road pavement is 7.5 metres wide, which is wide enough to enable parking on both sides of the road with sufficient width in between for emergency vehicles or garbage trucks to pass unhindered.

The construction of the footpath aligns with the Council Plan 2021-25, Wyndham Active Transport Strategy and supports Plan Melbourne key concept of creating 20-minute neighborhoods. North Gateway has been identified as a high priority location for footpath construction.

Providing a footpath on the west side of North Gateway will facilitate better access for as many users as possible with varying travel requirements and ability levels, it will also encourage more active transport. This aligns with the Council Plan statement that Council will, ‘Deliver and advocate for a quality, sustainable and accessible transport network that enables the community to move around the city easily.’

2.3 Findings/Recommendations:

Officers recommend:

·    An investigation is to take place to determine whether it is warranted to install traffic treatment(s) at/along North Gateway.

·    Given the objecting reasons in the petition appear to be subjective and that the reasons (linkage to a bus route, school and reserve) why the footpath was proposed in the first place remain valid, it is, therefore officers’ recommendation that the footpath construction continues as planned. 

3.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

·    Places and Spaces - People are able to move around Wyndham easily. They are able to get to where they want to go efficiently and with greater access to active, accessible and sustainable modes of transport.

4.      Council Plan

1.1 Provide high quality, equitable and accessible services and community facilities that cater for all ages and life stages.

·    Aligning with Wyndham’s vision of ‘a Liveable City’ by:

working with all levels of government and key stakeholders to ensure urban development and growth is managed to attain 20-minute neighbourhoods which allow residents to get around easily, work and play locally.

deliver and advocate for a quality, sustainable and accessible transport network that enables the community to move around the city easily’

5.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

Council’s adopted Wyndham Active Transport Strategy acknowledges the importance of providing a connected city through the delivery of new footpaths and shared user paths to fill in missing links in our footpath and shared user path network.

Footpaths are important, not only for exercise and wellbeing, but also for commuting and providing access to public transport which further improves liveability across our city. They are also important for reducing our impact on the environment by reducing car trips.

6.      Regional, State and National Plans and Policies

The State Government’s Plan Melbourne contains a key concept of creating 20-minute neighbourhoods. This concept aims to give people the ability to meet most of their everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle or local public transport trip of their home.

Plan Melbourne states, ‘these everyday needs include: local health services, childcare, libraries, sporting facilities, parks, cafes and shopping centres. Building pedestrian friendly neighbourhoods that connect people to these everyday needs will promote healthy lifestyles and ensures communities are accessible to people of all ages and abilities.’

7.      Financial Viability

Funding is currently available from the 2021/2022 Active Transport and Road Safety programs to fund for the footpath and speed treatments (if warranted).

8.      Social Implications:

The petition signatories have expressed concern about speeding and hooning in North Gateway. An investigation will be conducted to determine whether it is warranted to install traffic treatment(s) here. Assuming the investigation justifies the installation of speed treatments, this will be viewed favorably by the residents.

 

The petition signatories have also expressed concern about the proposed North Gateway footpath construction. It is unlikely the proposal to construct the footpath will be well received by all the residents abutting the west side of North Gateway.

However, it is important to recognize footpath construction benefits the wider community as it encourages the wider community to embrace sustainable transport modes.  Hence, we should be looking at this from a wider community perspective rather than looking at it from a localized community perspective.

The provision of a footpath at this location will create positive social impacts that will benefit residents that live in the immediate area connecting to North Gateway.

9.      Options

Option 1 Construct the path:

 

Pros:

·    Align with Council adopted Active Transport Strategy and encourage more walking in the areas.

·    Encourage residents to take up a more-healthy lifestyle and walk more.

Cons:

·    Unlikely to be received well by the petitioners as the proposal isn’t currently supported.

 

Option 2 Stop the construction:

 

Pros:

·    Will be well received by the petitioners.

Cons:

·    Restrict/reduce/discourage the local community from embracing alternative transport modes.

·    May well be used by other Wyndham communities as a precedent to object to future path construction. This will make it harder (if not impossible) to reach the goals identified in the Council adopted active transport strategy.

10.    Community Engagement

The findings of the endorsed report will be provided to the lead petitioner.

  


Strategic Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.2.1

Director City Operations - Stephen Thorpe

 

 

 

Road Management Plan 2021

 

Summary

The Road Management Plan has been reviewed. It is a requirement of the Road Management Act 2004 and regulations that the review needed to be completed by 31 October 2021. The aim of the Road Management Plan is to ensure public safety through road maintenance.

The Road Management Plan identifies responsibilities and sets the standards on how municipal roads are inspected and maintained to manage civil liability as well as demonstrate that the Council, as the road authority, is managing the municipal road network responsibly. It has been prepared with reference to other key Council policies and strategies and consideration to ensure that it is consistent with Council’s strategic directions.

The internal review of the existing Road Management Plan found that it was required to be revised. This revision has been completed and the revised plan is now recommended for adoption by Council following the recent community engagement (public exhibition) which took place between 7 September 2021 – 4 October 2021.

 

Attachments

1.

Road Management Plan 2021

2.

Community Engagement Summary Report

  

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Director City Operations - Stephen Thorpe

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Manager Roads and Maintenance - Mauro Covacci

In providing this advice as the Manager and Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·        Adoption of the revised Road Management Plan 2021.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopt the revised Road Management Plan 2021.

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Susan McIntyre / Sahana Ramesh

 

That Council adopt the revised Road Management Plan 2021.

 

(CARRIED)

1.      Background

It is part of Council’s legislated responsibilities to manage municipal roads in a manner that allows users to travel efficiently and safely. Wyndham has chosen to use a Road Management Plan (RMP) as part of its approach to managing roads, as allowed in the Road Management Act 2004 (RMA) and regulations. The revised RMP references key Council policies and strategies and consideration is given to these to ensure that the RMP is consistent with the adopted strategic directions.

The RMP aims to:

·    Contribute to the provision of a safe and efficient municipal road network for public use.

·    Establish the management system for the management of roads that Council is responsible for based on policy, operational objectives and available resources.

·    Set the standards of the road management functions around inspections, maintenance and repairs.

The RMA requires that the RMP be reviewed at set time intervals, as described in the Road Management (General) Regulations 2016.  This current review was completed by 31 October 2021.

2.      Relevant Law

The review of the RMP is required in accordance with the following legislation:

·    Road Management Act 2004.

·    Local Government Act 2020.

·    Local Government Act 1989.

·    Road Management (General) Regulations 2016.

3.      Discussion

An internal and community engagement review of the RMP has been conducted and completed. The scope of this review included:

·    Assessing the reasonableness of the RMP.

·    Assessing the resourcing and delivery of the RMP.

·    Assessing the accessibility of the RMP.

·    Legal review of the RMP.

·    Literature review of RMPs of other road authorities.

·    Literature review of legislation, regulations and codes of practice.

·    Evaluating the alignment of the RMP with other Council strategies and plans consistent with strategies aligned to transport planning such:

The Draft Wyndham Plan.

Active Transport Strategy Priorities.

Wyndham Integrated Transport Strategy.

Geelong Fast Rail/Western Rail Plan.

Wyndham Road Safety Strategy.

Wyndham Transport Priorities.

Long Term Financial Plan.

Community Engagement (public exhibition).

The review found the following areas to focus on for the revised RMP:

·    Making the document clearer, easier to understand and more accessible.

·    Updating out of date references.

·    Adding a standard for concrete roads and laneways so that they don’t use the same standard as for asphalt roads.

·    Change of standards, decreasing the intervention level for footpath height differentials from 30mm to 20mm.

Proposed change

Current setting

Explanation

Cost

Decrease footpath height differential intervention level to 20mm

Current height differential intervention level is 30mm

·    Improve public safety, reduce tripping hazards

Estimated at an additional $1 million per annum

Add standard for concrete roads

Asphalt road standard being used for concrete roads

·    More appropriate standard

·    Improve public safety, reduce tripping hazards

·    Reduce risk of negligence claims

No additional cost 

 

The revised RMP has been completed and is available for adoption by Council to publish, see Attachment 1 – Road Management Plan 2021.

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

·        Places and Spaces:
The review of the RMP fits under this theme in providing the framework for service provision identified in the specific services delivered by Council including:

Asset Management

Road & Amenity Maintenance

Road Design & Construction

5.      Council Plan

3.3 Provide sustainable infrastructure through the construction of new assets and renewal of existing assets

6.      Other Council Strategies, Plan and Policies

For the review of the RMP and the plan to be adopted, Council is required to engage with community. The engagement of the community was guided and aligned with Wyndham’s Community Engagement Policy. 

7.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Not Applicable.

8.      Financial Viability

It is proposed that the intervention level be change for footpath differential levels from 30mm to 20mm. The financial implication of this is an additional $1 million would be required to maintain footpaths each year.

If this change is included in the final RMP the required funds will need to be included in the Long-term Financial Plan.

9.      Sustainability Implications

As part of the review the sustainability of our road maintenance practices were evaluated from different perspectives. The first was alignment with community expectations now and into the future. The level of service has mostly stayed the same as we believe that the current settings are what the community expects. A change is proposed to the intervention level for footpath movement to reduce the risk of tripping.

The second was the financial sustainability of the budget, which has been considered as part of this review and proposed changes have cost estimates.

The third was asset management and the level of maintenance required to ensure that it is sufficient to extend the life of an asset as far as reasonably possible. By doing this, not only do we get the most value out of an asset, but it also reduces the need for new construction and the associated environmental costs.

10.    Options

The review and community consultation of the RMP is not optional in complying with Councils legislative requirements under the Local Government Act 2020 and the Road Management Act 2004.

11.    Community Engagement

The community engagement (public exhibition) process for any changes to the RMP was guided by Section 55 in the Local Government Act 2020, the Road Management Regulations and Wyndham City’s Community Engagement Policy.

A Community Engagement Plan was developed and went above and beyond the typical process that Councils go through when amending an RMP. Reviews typically involve inviting public comment on a revised RMP and limited advertising in the Victorian Government Gazette and newspapers. In the past it was found that adopting the approach in the regulations resulted in very little community feedback.

Therefore, this time in order to increase the opportunity for community feedback by modelling the Community Engagement Plan on Wyndham City’s Community Engagement Policy and equity frameworks. The increased marketing to the community through channels such as The Loop, social media and emails to stakeholders, improve messaging by tailoring communications for the audience, and allow reporting on the community engagement outcomes. This provided a broader engagement by the community to have a say on the RMP.

The outcomes of the community engagement process can be found in Attachment 2 – Community Engagement Summary Report.

12.    Communication Strategy

The communication to the community was advertised via the Victorian Government Gazette and newspapers. In addition to improve the level of engagement other platforms were utilised such as The Loop, social media and emails to stakeholders, improve messaging by tailoring communications for the audience, and allow reporting on the community engagement outcomes

13.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

The review of the RMP proposes changes to improve road safety in comparison to the previous RMP 2017. 

14.    Collaboration

Not Applicable.

 

 

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Road Management Plan 2021

 

Item No: 6.2.1

 

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ATTACHMENT No: 2 - Community Engagement Summary Report

 

Item No: 6.2.1

 

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Policy/Advocacy

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.3.1

Head of Strategy and Policy Impact - Natalie Walker

 

 

 

Invest in Opportunity - Federal Election Priorities

 

Summary

Wyndham City provides a range of infrastructure and services that support the wellbeing of the local community. However, there are many issues and infrastructure and service gaps that are not the direct responsibility of Council. Councils are largely reliant on State and Federal Government to fund and provide the infrastructure and services our community needs to prosper.

Council has had a strong advocacy and intergovernmental relations agenda for many years and has continually refined and reviewed its approach. Council’s approach is strategic, evidence based and sustained while also being agile and responsive to the governments of the day and the political cycle, including upcoming elections. 

A Federal election is required to be held by 21 May 2022. As such the lead up to the Federal election is a critical time for Council to continue engaging with all political parties and ensuring Wyndham’s needs are not only heard but met. 

Wyndham City is calling on political parties to support the following the transformational projects and initiatives:

·    Minister of Growth Areas

·    Activate East Werribee and unlock the Werribee National Employment and Innovation Cluster

·    Western Intermodal Freight Terminal

·    Wyndham Westlink

·    Outer Metropolitan Ring Transport Corridor

·    North and West Melbourne City Deal

·    Connecting regional growth and jobs

·    Opportunity Wyndham

·    Sports Infrastructure

·    Finance for Growth Areas

 

Attachments

1.

Invest in Opportunity – Wyndham City Federal Election Priorities

 

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Head of Strategy and Policy Impact - Natalie Walker

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Strategy and Stakeholder Engagement - Kate Waters

In providing this advice as the Manager and Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.


 

Key Issues

·    Wyndham City provides a range of infrastructure and services that support the wellbeing of the local community. However, there are many issues and infrastructure and service gaps that are not the direct responsibility of Council. Councils are largely reliant on State and Federal Government to fund and provide the infrastructure and services our community needs to prosper.

·    Council has had a strong advocacy and intergovernmental relations agenda for many years and has continually refined and reviewed its approach.

·    A Federal election is required to be held by 21 May 2022. This is a critical time for Council to continue engaging with all political parties.

·    Wyndham City is calling on political parties to commit to a number of transformational projects.

·    These projects will be prosecuted through engagement with political parties, partners and key stakeholders and through relevant media and communication.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorse Wyndham City’s Federal Election Priorities and continue to advocate for these priorities to all political parties in the lead up to the Federal Election. 

 

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Jasmine Hill / Josh Gilligan

 

That Council endorse Wyndham City’s Federal Election Priorities and continue to advocate for these priorities to all political parties in the lead up to the Federal Election. 

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

Wyndham City provides a range of infrastructure and services that support the wellbeing of the local community.

We run community centres and libraries, provide early years and maternal health services, and maintain local parks and open spaces. We also maintain local roads, and provide rubbish collection and waste disposal services, along with a range of other local infrastructure and services designed to improve the lives of Wyndham residents.

However, there are many issues and infrastructure and service gaps that are not the direct responsibility of Council. Councils are largely reliant on State and Federal Government to fund and provide the infrastructure and services our community needs to prosper.

That’s why it’s important for us to communicate our needs and seek action from politicians, government departments, and other key stakeholders.

Approach to Advocacy

Council has had a strong advocacy and intergovernmental relations agenda for many years and has continually refined and reviewed its approach to reflect the governments of the day and the needs of the community.

This work has occurred in a variety of ways including but not limited to public campaigns, formal submissions, meetings with Ministers, Members of Parliament and their advisors and maintaining ongoing relationships with key government departments.

Councillors and senior officers are also representatives on a range of alliances, associations, committees and working groups and hold many important stakeholder relationships.

Council’s approach is strategic, evidence based and sustained while also being agile and responsive. 

A Federal election is required to be held by 21 May 2022. As such the lead up to the Federal election is a critical time for Council to continue engaging with all political parties and ensuring Wyndham’s needs are not only heard but also met. 

2.      Relevant Law

Not Applicable

3.      Discussion

Wyndham is a place for people, a place for opportunity. A growing, vibrant and diverse City. As a community we are building a connected and sustainable City with local and regional opportunities for work, education and leisure.

In the lead-up to the Federal election, Wyndham City is asking all political parties to invest in opportunity by investing in Wyndham. Investing in Wyndham represents a unique opportunity to support the recovery of the Australian economy. Strategically located and a centre of growth and activity even during the pandemic, Wyndham is a vital western hub in a renewed vision of Greater Melbourne that connects  suburban centres and surrounding regions.

With transport links to the Melbourne CBD and Geelong, Sunshine and Footscray as key business and transport centres, Wyndham is a strategic location to invest in economic development.

Activity related to Wyndham’s ongoing population growth and available land in key locations can drive strong economic growth if supported by Federal Government investment in key infrastructure and services.

Wyndham has strong potential to create a liveable and sustainable post-COVID city which provides local employment opportunities and lifestyle advantages being delivered by improved local neighbourhood connections.

With Federal Government support and investment Wyndham will seize the opportunity to deliver a more self-sustaining and resilient western hub as part of Greater Melbourne’s reimagined future.

Wyndham City is calling on all political parties to commit to the following transformational projects and initiatives:

·    Minister of Growth Areas

·    Activate East Werribee and unlock the Werribee National Employment and Innovation Cluster

·    Western Intermodal Freight Terminal

·    Wyndham Westlink

·    Outer Metropolitan Ring Transport Corridor

·    North and West Melbourne City Deal

·    Connecting regional growth and jobs

·    Opportunity Wyndham

·    Sports Infrastructure

·    Finance for Growth Areas

Further detailed on each project is included in the ‘Invest in Opportunity – Wyndham City Federal Election Priorities,’ as presented at attachment 1

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

The Wyndham City priorities for the Federal election all support the achievement of the Wyndham 2040 Community Vision and its subsequent themes:

·    People and Community

·    Places and Spaces

·    Earning and Learning

·    Leadership and Participation

5.      Council Plan

7.2 Ensure the needs of the community are well represented through effective advocacy and strong collaborative partnerships with key stakeholder and all levels of Government.

6.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

·    Securing Wyndham’s Future

·    Wyndham Integrated Transport Strategy

·    Social and Economic Inclusion Framework

·    Wyndham Sports Strategy

·    Active Wyndham Strategy

7.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Council’s approach to advocacy is aligned and responsive to regional, state and national plans and policies.

8.      Financial Viability

Strategic advocacy for Federal funding of projects that benefit Wyndham is essential to support the financial viability of the city, providing necessary infrastructure and services and reducing costs that would otherwise need to be covered within Council’s budget.

9.      Sustainability Implications

Several of the Federal election projects support the sustainability of Wyndham through a focus on economic, social and environment outcomes

10.    Options

Not applicable

11.    Community Engagement

Council’s approach to advocacy is based around advocating for the issues that are of concern to residents, reflecting matters raised in the Annual Community Satisfaction Survey and other community engagement findings.

12.    Communication Strategy

Wyndham City’s Federal election priorities will be communicated via:

·    Meetings with Ministers, shadow Ministers, candidates and other key stakeholders

·    Strategic partnerships with organisations whose interests align with those of our community, including regional and interface Councils, industry partners, community partners, Leadwest and the National Growth Areas Alliance.

·    Relevant media including social media, print media, radio and television

13.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Council’s approach to advocacy is continually refined and reviewed to ensure it is responding to the community needs and the governments of the day.

14.    Collaboration

Wyndham City continues to work with the community as an active partner to inform our strategic priorities and to help us understand what Wyndham needs. Council has also been forming strategic partnerships with organisations whose interests align with those of our community, including regional and interface Councils, industry partners, Leadwest and the National Growth Areas Alliance. By collaborating with our partners, we promote policies and solutions that the State and Federal Government can adopt to improve life in Wyndham.

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Invest in Opportunity – Wyndham City Federal Election Priorities

 

Item No: 6.3.1

 

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Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.1

Head of Strategy and Policy Impact - Natalie Walker

 

 

 

Quarterly Community Report: Quarter 1 2021-22

 

Summary

The Quarterly Community Report provides a snapshot of Council’s work during the first quarter of the 2021-22 financial year. It tracks the implementation of the Council Plan 2021-25 and updates the community on how the major projects and capital works committed to are progressing and how resources are being spent in line with the Annual Plan and Budget 2020-21.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Quarterly Community Report (Quarter 1: July, August, September 2021)

 

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Head of Strategy and Policy Impact - Natalie Walker

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Strategy and Stakeholder Engagement - Kate Waters

In providing this advice as the Manager, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Organisational and Planning Strategy Lead - Alexandra Sosa

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·    Throughout July to September 2021, Council services continued to be delivered in adapted formats to ensure adherence with COVID-19 restrictions.

·    100 per cent (21) of all Major Initiatives and 84.2 per cent (16) of all Initiatives committed to within the Annual Plan and Budget 2021-22 are progressing. Two initiatives have been completed.

·    Despite unavoidable delays due to the COVID-19 restrictions (in particular the two week shutdown of the construction industry and disruption of supply chains globally), Council is on track to deliver $174m worth of capital works by the end of the financial year.

·    The Underlying year to date (YTD) September results highlight an operating deficit after depreciation and amortisation of $70K which is $11.3M favourable when compared to (YTD) budget. This favourable result includes higher than budget revenue of $1.35M and lower than budget expenditure of $9.9M.

·    Based on a review of these Underlying results for the Quarter 1 and the resumption of operations, the 2021-22 financial year has been forecast as being equal to budget.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note the Quarterly Community Report for Quarter 1 (July, August, September 2021) and the progress made to implement the Annual Plan and Budget 2021-22 and the Council Plan 2021-25.

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Jasmine Hill / Mia Shaw

 

That Council note the Quarterly Community Report for Quarter 1 (July, August, September 2021) and the progress made to implement the Annual Plan and Budget 2021-22 and the Council Plan 2021-25.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

Council is committed to a continuous cycle of planning, reporting and review to ensure it delivers the best outcomes for the community. The Quarterly Community Report is essential for ensuring transparency and accountability as to how public money is being spent and the work and services being delivered.

It is an important component of Council’s Integrated Strategic Planning and Reporting Framework, allowing Council to track the implementation of the Council Plan 2021-25. It provides an update on how the major projects and capital works committed to are progressing and how resources are being spent in line with the Annual Plan and Budget 2021-22.

2.      Relevant Law

·    Local Government Act 2020

 

3.      Discussion

Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic continued to be a focused throughout July, August and September 2021, with Council services continuing to be delivered in adapted formats to ensure adherence with COVID-19 restrictions.

Some key highlights for the quarter include:

·    19 online citizenship ceremonies with 187 new citizens conferred

·    18km of new footpaths constructed

·    2,556 trees planted

·    14 education programs delivered to increase knowledge and care for the environment with 974 program attendees

·    108 businesses attend a business event

·    15 new businesses committed to providing local employment opportunities

·    42,746 visits were made to a library and there were two Pop-Up library sessions (in early July) at the Wyndham Park Community Centre and the Wunggurrwil Dhurrung Centre

·    The launch of the new Wyndham Community Grants program in July. The program has so far provided the community with $54,336 via the Small Grants category and Community Pathways Scholarships

·    20 community engagement projects were open for consultation and 1,105 new members signed up to the Loop, Council’s online community engagement platform

·    945 community members from a diverse array of backgrounds joined the People’s Advisory Panel

·    1,069,814 visits to the Wyndham City website

·    52,316 calls where received by Customer Service.

 

100 per cent (21) of all Major Initiatives and 84.2 per cent (16) of all Initiatives committed to within the Annual Plan and Budget 2021-22 are progressing.

 

Two initiatives have been completed:

·    Undertake the development of the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2021-25

·    Revise and implement a renewed Wyndham Community Grants Policy and Program to support community capacity building, activation and recovery.

Capital works

 

Despite unavoidable delays due to COVID-19 restrictions (in particular the two week shutdown of the construction industry and disruption of supply chains globally), Council is on track to deliver $174m worth of capital works by the end of the financial year. Highlights during quarter 1 include:

·    Completion of the Wyndham Parks 2021 program

·    Completion of the Galvin Park Soccer Pavilion Redevelopment

·    Completion of the Dianella Community Centre

·    Truganina South East Integrated Family Centre and Tarneit North Integrated Family Centre are both under construction.

·    Works are progressing to improve walking and cycling paths across the municipality.

 

Financial Performance

The Underlying year to date (YTD) September results highlight an operating deficit after depreciation and amortisation of $70K which is $11.3M favourable when compared to (YTD) budget. This favourable result includes higher than budget revenue of $1.35M and lower than budget expenditure of $9.9M.

The closure of Councils Western Leisure Services and other Council facilities including community and cultural centres required under the COVID-19 restrictions, impacted both revenue and expenditure. In addition there was also lower operating expenditure for materials and services and lower workforce related costs.

Based on a review of these Underlying results for Quarter 1 and the resumption of operations, the 2021-22 financial year has been forecast as being equal to budget.

The Quarterly Community Report: Quarter 1 2021-22, is presented at attachment 1.

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

Through the Leadership and Participation theme of the Wyndham 2040 Community Vision, the community told Council that it is important for Council to be accountable and transparent for their decision making, particularly in relation to financial sustainability and planning for growth and development.

The Quarterly Community Report promotes good management of Council’s resources, transparency and accountability as to how public money is being spent and fosters a focus on performance and ensuring quality services are being delivered within the financial parameters set.

5.      Council Plan and Policies

The Quarterly Community Report contributes to meeting the following Council Plan strategies;

Community As An Active Partner

·    Foster trust in Council through the implementation of effective civic leadership and responsible governance processes that ensure accountability and compliance with all legislated and statutory requirements.

 

 

Delivering Public Value and Excellence

·    Secure its financial sustainability into the future through responsible management of Council’s annual budgets and long-term financial outlook.

6.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Not Applicable.

7.      Financial Viability

The Quarterly Community Report promotes good management of Council’s resources, transparency and accountability as to how public money is being spent and fosters a focus on performance and ensuring quality services are being delivered within the financial parameters set.

8.      Sustainability Implications

Not Applicable.

9.      Options

Not Applicable.

10.    Community Engagement

The Quarterly Community Report is a key component of Council’s Integrated Strategic Planning and Reporting Framework. The Council Plan 2021-25 commits Council to communicating the report to the community on a quarterly basis.

11.    Communication Strategy

The Quarterly Community Report will be made available through the Council website.

12.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Not Applicable.

13.    Collaboration

Not Applicable.


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Quarterly Community Report (Quarter 1: July, August, September 2021)

 

Item No: 6.5.1

 

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Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.2

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

 

 

 

Financial Management Report - Quarter 1 - 2021/2022

 

Summary

The preparation of a quarterly Financial Report is a statutory requirement under section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act)

This paper provides a report on Council’s financial results for the first quarter of the 2021/22 financial year covering the period 1 July 2021 to 30 September 2021 (Year to Date September) and compares this against the 2021/22 budget set for the equivalent period.

The Year to Date September results highlight a net favourable Underlying result to budget of $11.3M.  This includes favourable revenue of $1.35M and lower expenditure $9.9M when compared to Year to Date (YTD) budget.

The Financial Mangement Report provided in Attachment 1 provides commentary on the financial results and variances.

In summary:

The total operating revenue was $93.5M which is $1.35M higher than the budgeted amount of $92.2M. The higher revenue is primarily due to extra revenue received at the Refuse Disposal Facility (RDF) along with grants received in 2020/21 but recognised as revenue in 2021/22 to comply with recent changes in accounting regulations. This was partially offset by the loss of revenue as a consequence of the extended closure of Council facilities required under the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The primary services impacted include Council’s Western Leisure Services (WLS) and other Council facilities including Community and Cultural centres.

The total operating expenses including Depreciation & Amortisation was $93.6M which is $9.9M lower than the budgeted amount of $103.5M. The lower expenditure outcome is consistent with the closure of key Council facilities mentioned above with lower level of operating expenditure for Materials and Services and lower workforce related costs.

The report also provides a forecast outlook as at Quarter 1 for the full 2021/22 financial year.  This is compared against the full year budget in order to identify the expected variations from Council’s original annual budget expectations. Expected variances across revenue and expenditure categories are detailed in the report. Overall, the full year forecast positon is consistent with budget

 

Attachments

1.

Financial Management Report - Quarter 1 - 2021/22

 

  

 


 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Chief Executive Officer – Stephen Wall

In providing this advice as the CEO, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Chief Financial Officer - Binda Gokhale

In providing this advice as the CFO, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Financial Controller – Michael Kelly

In providing this advice as the Manager, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Finance Manager - Alex Nava

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·        Financial results as at 31 March 2021.

·        2020/21 Financial and Capital expenditure full year forecasts.

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note the information provided in the Financial Management Report for Quarter 1 Financial Year 2021/22 as required under Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020.

 

 

 

MOTION

 

CRS Josh Gilligan / Adele Hegedich

 

That Council note the information provided in the Financial Management Report for Quarter 1 Financial Year 2021/22 as required under Section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

The preparation of a quarterly Financial Report is a statutory requirement under section 97 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act).  This section requires that:

1.    As soon as practicable after the end of each quarter of the financial year, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a quarterly budget report is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public.

2.    A quarterly budget report must include:

  (a) a comparison of the actual and budgeted results to date; and

  (b) an explanation of any material variances; and

  (c) any other matters prescribed by the regulations.

Council’s process is to thoroughly review the key revenue and expenditure items each quarter for material movements when compared against the budget.  This is to determine if these movements are purely timing related over the course of the year. As an example, a timing difference may be due to project expenditure budgeted to be incurred in one month which may have been delayed to a future month within that year. 

Alternatively, the reason for the variance may be more ‘permanent’ in nature for that year whereby a specific initiative anticipated to be undertaken in that year, will no longer proceed.

This report provides an overview of Council’s financial results for the first quarter of the 2021/22 financial year covering the period 1 July 2021 to 30 September 2021 (Year to Date September) and compares this against the 2021/22 budget set for the equivalent period. The report also includes an update on the Capital Works program for the year and provides a forecast financial outlook for the end of the financial year.

2.      Discussion

 

Financial Performance – Quarter 1

The financial results to 30 September 2021 have been impacted by the extended COVID-19 lockdown in the first quarter and the resulting effect on Council’s services. Certain services were not able to be provided due to restrictions, whilst other support services were prioritised to meet community needs and expectations through this pandemic. The year to date results also reflect a higher level of revenue from Council’s Landfill  (RDF) which is expected to be maintained in the full year.

The Underlying year to date (YTD) September results highlight an operating deficit after depreciation and amortisation of $70K which is $11.3M favourable when compared to YTD budget:

Total underlying operating revenue was $93.5M which is $1.35M higher than the budgeted amount of $92.2M. The higher revenue is primarily due to extra revenue received at the RDF along with grants received in 2020/21 but recognised as revenue in 2021/22 to comply with recent changes in accounting regulations. This was partially offset by the loss of revenue as a consequence of the extended closure of Council facilities required under the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The primary services impact include Council’s Western Leisure Services and other Council facilities including Community and Cultural centres.

 

Total underlying operating expenses including Depreciation & Amortisation was $93.6M which is $9.9M lower than the budgeted amount of $103.5M. The lower expenditure outcome is consistent with the closure of key Council facilities mentioned above and maintenance works required to be put on hold resulting in lower level of operating expenditure for Materials and Services and lower workforce related costs.

In addition to the Underlying results, Capital revenue for the period was $51.7M which is $4.4M lower than budget mainly due to a reduction of $7.6M in Developer Contributions partially offset by higher than budgeted Capital grants of $3.4M.

The Total Net surplus YTD September is $51.6M, which is $6.8M higher than YTD budget.

Quarter 1 – Full Year Forecast

The full year Underlying result has been forecast to be consistent with the full year budget with offsetting variances in the expected revenue and expenditure outcomes.

The forecast includes lower revenue from the closure of WLS and other Council facilities ($5.8M), higher expenditure for IT licensing and security ($1.3M), offset by the favourable Net operating result for the RDF ($2.9M) and expected lower employee costs ($4.2M):

Further details are provided in the Financial Management Report – Attachement 1.

Capital Works

Councils 2021/22 capital works program includes 151 projects and programs equaling an investment of $196.5M. Actual expenditure in the first quarter was $14.5M which was lower than budget. The delivery of planned capital works during 2021/22 had some unavoidable delays due to pandemic-related restrictions. In particular, there was a two-week shutdown of the construction industry and the disruption of supply chains globally. It is expected that as a consequence some expenditure will continue into 2022/23. The forecast has been updated to reflect these delays, and we are currently forecasting a total capital spend of $174.1m.

2021-22 budgeted Loan borrowings associated with funding projects as part of the Capital works program have been deferred until 2022, pending a revised capital program and cash flow forecasts which will be undertaken for Quarter 2.

3.      Council Plan

8.1 Secure its financial sustainability into the future through responsible management of Council's annual budgets and long term financial outlook

4.      Other Council Strategies, Plan and Policies

The Annual Plan and Budget takes into consideration the Council Plan and related operational policies.  

5.      Financial Viability

This Report addresses the financial viability of Council in the context of reporting against budget expectations for the 2021/22 Financial year. The full year forecast highlights that the Underlying results are expected to be equal to budget and therefore no impact on Council’s financial viability.

6.      Sustainability Implications

The Quarter 1 financial results have been impacted by the extended Covid-19 lockdown however the forecast outlook for the year considers the favourable performance of the RDF facility together with other variances for Council to deliver in line with the budget settings.

7.      Community Engagement

Council’s annual budget is underpinned by an extensive community deliberative process regarding services and community priorities.

8.      Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Council continues to review and drive improvement in its management reporting processes to ensure that our community is kept well informed regarding financial outcomes.

9.      Collaboration

All service areas of Council are engaged and collaborate on the development of annual operational and capital budgets.  Monthly meetings are held with internal stakeholders to ensure that the operation drivers and financial outcomes are reviewed and understood.  Quarterly reports are developed also in collaboration with service and project managers.

 

 

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Financial Management Report - Quarter 1 - 2021/22

 

Item No: 6.5.2

 

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1.      Financial Management Report 2021/22
September 2021

Executive Summary

This is the Quarter 1 (Q1) Financial Management Report provided to Council for the 2021/22 Financial Year.

The report provides an overview of Council’s financial results for the first quarter of the 2021/22 financial year covering the period from 1 July 2021 to 30 September 2021 (Year to Date September) and compares this against the 2021/22 budget set for the equivalent period.

The results are impacted by the extended COVID-19 lockdown and the resulting effect on Council’s services:

·    Certain services have not been able to be provided due to restrictions, resulting in both lower revenue and lower expenses incurred over the reporting period.

·    Other  support services have been prioritised to meet community needs through this pandemic with related expenditure being incurred.

·    Additional revenue has been recognised for Government Grants and Council’s Landfill (RDF) operations.

The Underlying year to date (YTD) September results highlight an operating deficit after depreciation and amortisation of $70K which is $11.3M favourable when compared to (YTD) budget:

Total operating revenue was $93.5M which is $1.35M higher than the budgeted amount of $92.2M. The higher revenue is primarily due to extra revenue received at the RDF along with grants received in 2020/21 but recognised as revenue in 2021/22 to comply with recent changes in accounting regulations. This was partially offset by the loss of revenue as a consequence of the extended closure of Council facilities required under the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. The primary services impact include Council’s Western Leisure Services and other Council facilities including Community and Cultural centres.

Total operating expenses including Depreciation & Amortisation was $93.6M which is $9.9M lower than the budgeted amount of $103.5M. The lower expenditure outcome is consistent with the closure of key Council facilities mentioned above and maintenance works required to be put on hold resulting in lower level of operating expenditure for Materials and Services and lower workforce related costs.

Capital income is $51.7M which is $4.4M lower than budget mainly due to $7.6M in lower Developer Contributions received over this  period,  partially offset by higher than budgeted Capital grants of $3.4M.

The net surplus YTD September is $51.6M, which is $6.8M higher than YTD budget.

This report also provides a forecast summary for the 2021/22 financial year as at the end of Q1 and compares it against the full year budget in order to identify the expected variations from Council’s original annual expections.

Based on the Q1 review conducted, variances have been identified across some revenue and expenditure categories, however the Underlying Operating result at an aggregate level for the full 2021/22 financial year has been forecast as being equal to the budget:

Total underlying operating revenue of $374.3M which is $0.5M lower than the full year budgeted amount of $374.8M. Q1 forecast assumes that there will be extra sources of revenue mainly from the RDF operations that will partially offset the revenue not generated in the first half of the year as a consequence of COVID-19 lockdown restrictions.

 

Total underlying operating expenses including depreciation & amortisation of $416.6M is favourable to the budgeted position by $0.5M. Quarter 1 forecast assumes savings in employee benefits of $4.2M offset by higher expenditure in Materials and Services mainly due to the additional EPA levy in line with the increased number of tonnes expected. There is no expected variance in the Depreciation & Amortisation expenditure for the year highlighted at this stage.

The net surplus forecast inclusive of capital revenue for the year is $178.6M, which is $2.7M lower due to lower than budget fleet sales.

Full year budget expectations will be reviewed again as part of the Quarter 2 (Q2) forecast.

Further information on the key revenue and expense categories is provided in the Income Statement Table under Section 3 and in the related commentary within subsequent sections.

 


 

 

2.      Background

 

In setting the 2021/22 Budget, consideration was given to the effect of COVID-19 on our community and Council’s operations.  This was informed by the Government’s response to the pandemic and Council’s own assessement through its community interactions and critical response processes.

Based on the economic outlook at the time, a level of recovery and transition to a ‘COVID Normal’ was anticipated, however, the first quarter of the 2021/22 Financial Year was negatively impacted by continued COVID-19 lockdown measures.

Council’s process is to thoroughly review the key revenue and expenditure items each month for material movements when compared against the budget.  This is to determine if these movements are purely timing related over the course of the year. As an example, a timing difference may be due to project expenditure budgeted to be incurred in one month which may have been delayed to a future month within that year.

Alternatively, the reason for the variance may be more ‘permanent’ in nature for that year whereby a specific initaitve anticipated to be undertaken in that year, will no longer proceed.

The state government is expecting to ease COVID-19 lockdown restrictions by the end of October 2021. However, uncertainty around the impact of the pandemic will continue for some time, which Council will actively and closely monitor. In terms of financial management, Council will continue to review and prioritise service needs based on community health and social & economic support, and decide whether any adjustments are required for our full year forecast, both from an operational and capital perspective.


 

3.      Financial Statements and Commentary

 

The table below provides the Income Statement highlighting the Q1 results and variances together with the end of year forecast assessed at this time.

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(+1/-1 variances in these statements will be due to rounding of source date)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and Expenditure commentary

 

Ø Rates and Charges

September YTD, rates and charges category shows an increase of $1.0M compared to September YTD budget. This increase is mainly driven by $ 761K higher than budgeted supplementary rates, which is expected to be of a timing nature and $270K interest recognised on outstanding rates for those accounts not currently being managed under any of Council’s hardship provisions.

Quarter 1 forecast expects that some of the favourable variance will carry through to the full year.

 

Ø Operating Grants

Revenue from operating grants is $2.55M higher than assumed in the budget. The variance can be explained as follows:

·    $2.1M carried forward from grants received in 2020/21 considered as revenue in 2021/22 as per Accounting regulations. 

·    $220K early receipt of the Jobs Victoria Advocates originally expected in the second quarter of the year.

·    $124K additional funding received in the Community Planning & Development area which can be expected to be spent on service provision.  Also reflected is $119K extra funding from the Financial Assistance Grants to that advised at the time of budget setting.

Q1 forecast includes a marginal increase in grants of $509K compared to 2021/22 budget. Q2 will provide a more accurate estimate of the expected revenue once the current grant applications are finalised.

 

Ø  User Fees

User fees revenue is lower than budget expectations by $1.25M. There are a number of community focused facilities that have been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 lockdown requiring closure during the first quarter of the year. The budget already included lower than normal user fee revenues, but did not anticipate full facility closures. The facilities negatively affected primarily include:

·    $2.23M – Aqua Pulse and Eagle Stadium (WLS)

·    $373K – Council facilities such as Community Centres, Cultural Centre and Encore events centre.

Additionally, there is $370K lower cost recovery charge outs including $211K from debt collection fees as Council suspended its debt recovery process as a measure to help ratepayers in financial hardship due to COVID-19 restrictions.

This lower revenue has been partially offset by $1.7M of additional user fees revenue generated from higher volumes of bulk waste brought by commercial customers to the RDF relative to budget.

Quarter 1 forecast expects almost no movement in User fees compared to 2021/22 budget.  Additional revenue of $6.36M from the RDF is offset by the expected loss in revenue of $4.7M from WLS and $1.1M lower revenue from the closure of Council facilities. It is also expected that the rates debt recovery process will not resume later in the year, and this will negatively affect the yearly cost recovery revenue by around $461K.

 

 

 

Ø  Statutory Fees and Fines

Enforcement activities during COVID-19 restrictions have been limited to public safety measures resulting in $506K less revenue than September YTD budget expectations. Building & Litter and Parking Management account for $175K and $307K respectively as the main contributors for the lower revenue. This is largely due to the easing of fine implementation to mostly focus on public safety, as well as to support the community during the pandemic.

Q1 forecast considers that the YTD variances identified will become permanent by year end, with a further impact of $75K in lower revenue, recognising the extension of the lockdown into the first month of Quarter 2.

 

Ø  Other Revenue

Other revenue is $395K lower than budgeted, primarily due to less revenue received from Council’s term deposits, given the low interest rates that prevail in the market.

Quarter 1 forecast predicts that other revenue will be less than budget by around $1.17M mainly due to the lower than budgeted interest rates on Council’s term deposits. The budgeted investment rate was a weighted average of 0.63% compared to a forecast rate of 0.45%.

 

Ø  Employee Costs

September YTD, shows an underspend of $2.8M across Council mainly due to a delay in filling vacant positions in services with reduced operations due to COVID-19 restrictions.

The main variances are as follows:

·    $1.0M underspend in People & Community focused services with reduced operations during the Statewide lockdown, primarily Maternal & Child Health ($468K), Kinder Operations ($229K), Home Based Care ($95K) and School Crossing supervisors ($278K).

·    $886K underspend in areas linked to Places and Spaces related services, primarily in Roads & Maintenance ($228K), Planning & Building ($241K), RDF ($202k), Parkland Maintenance ($150k) and Climate Futures ($65k).

·    September YTD, Training & Development and Conferences & Seminars were below budget by $570K mainly due to the cancellation of most of face to face events as a result of the lockdown restrictions.

Q1 forecast predicts a reduction in Employee costs of $4.15M compared to budget by year end, mainly from savings of $2.2M in salaries and on-costs of $400K as reflected in the YTD results. Additionally, Training & Development and Conferences & Seminars may provide further savings of $604K along with extra capitalisation of salaries of $1.1M attributable to workforce costs relating to capital program demand.

 

Ø  Materials and Services

September YTD, Materials and Services expenditure was $5.8M lower than budget in response to closure of facilities and delays in budgeted projects. The most significant YTD variances are described below:

·    Subcontractors expenditure was $3.0M below budget, mostly in Facilities and Open Space related services. This was mainly due to the slowdown in Council’s activities given the current COVID restrictions. However, it is expected that once the restrictions are lifted, the expenditure will trend back to budget expectations with catchup in activity planned.

 

·     There was an underspend of approximately $1.2M in operational expenses such as Printing, Postage, Repairs & Maintenance, Utilities and Telephone charges. This was reflective of the closure of Council facilities and a significant number of staff working from home due to COVID restrictions.

·    Expenditure on Materials General shows an underspend of $811K directly related to the installation of RFID and Bin Lid standardization project. The project is expected to occur in the second half of the financial year.

·    Timing differences (See explanation on Section 2 Background) of $2.3M in categories such as Cloud solutions, Connectivity, Council memberships, Consultants, Marketing and Advertising are expected to occur within the financial year and the variance versus budget is just temporary.

·    Additional $212K savings in Debt Collection Fees, as Council put on hold its debt recovery processes during the pandemic to avoid adding extra pressure on residents experiencing financial hardship.

In contrast, the following amounts partially offset the unspent money explained above:

·    $1.2M additional EPA levy expenditure because of the additional number of tonnages received in the landfill compared to 2021/22 budget assumptions.

·    $812K overspend in Permits and licenses to pay for a number of licences required and the enhancement of security features in Council IT systems which were not identified within the budget

Q1 forecast anticipates a $4.3M increase in Materials and Services expenditure compared to budget by the end of the financial year.  The primary drivers for the increase include:

·    a $3.4M increase in EPA levy in line with the increased number of tonnes expected to be received at the RDF.

·    unbudgeted $1.3M in Permits, Licenses and Registration related to licensing and IT security measures and

·    a further $561K increase in subcontractors to deliver additional work in areas mostly related to parks and open space.

Offset by:

·    savings of $537K from lower expenditure on some services linked to the closure of Council facilities and a significant number of staff working from home due to COVID restrictions

·    savings of $413K from debt collection fees as the debt recovery process has been put on hold during the pandemic.

 

Ø  Other Expenses and Finance Costs

Grants and contributions together with finance costs show a minor underspend of $23K September YTD.

However, Q1 forecast expects a reduction of $670K mainly from reduced interest expense as consideration of borrowings being deferred to later in the financial year.

 

Ø  Capital Income

Council recognises as revenue grants received for capital projects, monies received from developer contributions and value of assets transferred to Council (‘Gifted Assets’).

 

September YTD capital grants revenue is $10.6M, which is $3.48M higher than budget expectations. This amount includes $9.8M received in 2020/21 but recognised as revenue in 2021/22 to comply with current Accounting regulations, along with $601K received under Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program, and $158K received for Werribee West Children's Centre.

September YTD Council received $9.2M in Cash Contributions, which is $7.6M lower than YTD budget which is expected as a full year trend. This income is recognised as revenue when cash is received from developers and is retained in reserves and applied to future infrastructure capital works projects as defined in the Developer Contribution Plans.

September YTD Non-monetary contributions are in line with the Budget and relates to transfers of gifted assets from developers to Council. Once transferred, Council assumes ownership and becomes responsible for their maintenance and future reconstruction.

Overall, with regards to Capital Income, Council expects to receive around $22.4M less in cash from developer contributions.  This is now expected to be received in the form of non-monetary assets and is reflective of the S173 agreements signed with developers

 

 

Ø  Borrowings

There have been no borrowings undertaken in the period to September 2021. Budgeted borrowings of $40M to refinance existing loan maturing on 12 November 2021 will be deferred until 2022.

Quarter 1 forecast assumes that no new borrowings will be undertaken for the Capital works program in 2021-22. This will be reassessed based on progress of Council’s Capital Program and cash flow forecasts as part of the Quarter 2 forecast.


 

Ø  Summary of Capital Expenditure

 

As at the end of September 2021 $14.5M of the $196.5M approved full year budget has been spent.

The Capital works Quarter 1 forecast is as follows:

 

Capital Budget 2021-22

$196.5m

 

“In-flight” projects from previous year

+$20.4m

2020-21 budgeted expenditure was $106.1M versus Actual of $78.4M or a variance of $27.6M

Cancelled/paused projects

-$4.8m

Discovery Centre, Werribee Library & Community Hub

Expenditure delayed into 22/23

-$40.1m

Includes Truganina & Black Forest Road South CCs, Manor Lakes IFC, Tarneit North Masterplan, Westmeadows Lane, Werribee Catalyst Site payment

Current forecast

$172.0m

 

Additional projects for inclusion

+$2.1m

 

Total revised forecast

$174.1m

 

 

The table below summarises the amount spent in Capital works and its funding sources as at the end of September 2021 and includes comparison to Budget and Q1 forecast expectations:

 

Capital Funding

YTD Actual Funding Source

$’000’s

Full Year Budget

$’000’s

Quarter 1 forecast

$’000’s

Grants

1,790

28,458

23,900

Contributions

3,890

67,338

51,800

Borrowings

-

27,052

*24,800

Council Cash

9,352

73,695

73,600

Total Capital works

15,032

196,543

174,100

 

*Assumed to be financed from working capital at this stage

 

 

 


 

Balance Sheet


Key Balance Sheet categories commentary

Assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash and investments such as cash held in the bank and the value of investments in term deposits.

However, Council’s cash and cash equivalents are subject to restrictions that limit the amounts available for discretionary use. September YTD, the amount of Cash and Cash equivalents considered as restricted is $448.4M ($409.5M in reserves from developer contributions, $38.9M from trust and funds deposits) which represents 72.2% of the cash that Council holds.

Trade and other receivables

Trade and other receivables are monies owed to Council by ratepayers and other customers for the collection of rates, outstanding infringements, waste received at the landfill and other services that Council provides. September YTD, the receivables reflect the full year rates that have been generated that are payable by instalments. It is expected that by year end this balance will reduce to $75.2M, which is $38.9M higher compared to budget. This reflects the high take up of rates assistance measures including deferred payment arrangements.

Property, infrastructure, plant and equipment

The category of Property, infrastructure, plant and equipment predominantly represents the value of Council’s land, building, roads and landfill assets. The increase in this category is due to gifted assets and from assets constructed and acquired by Council as part of the annual capital works program.


Liabilities

Trade and other payables

Trade and other payables are those suppliers of operational and capital goods and services to whom Council owes money as at balance date.

Interest bearing loans and borrowings

Council has two borrowings under the program established by the Local Government Financial Vehicle (LGFV).  A $40M loan which is due on 12 November 2021 and additional $15M due on 23 June 2026.


 

Cash Flow

Graphical user interface, text, application

Description automatically generated

 

Cash flow commentary

Q1 forecast cash flow highlights a closing balance of $543.6 which is $5.8M higher compared to 2021/22 budgeted amount of $537.8M. The key reasons for the cash flow movements can be explained as follows:

·    $38.6M reduction in rates and charges collection due to the impact of COVID-19. Collection of rates compared to revenue is forecast at 95% against a historical average of 97.5%.

·    Receipts from debtors are expected to decrease $24.1M in comparison to budget mainly due to the forecast reduction of monetary contributions from developers.

·      Outflow of cash from Payment to Suppliers/Capital category is expected to reduce by $17.7M. This includes an expected decrease in capital spend partially offset by increases in outflow for landfill rehabilitation works and additional Materials and Services spend mainly from the forecast increase in EPA levy.

·    Payments to employees is expected to reduce by $3.7M mainly due to vacancies and savings achieved in the first quarter which are expected to be realised for the full year.

·    Borrowings of $30M for the Capital Works program have been deferred at this stage and will be reassessed in Q2 forecast depending on the cash flow requirements. The refinancing of an existing $40M loan facility (Current liability) will be considered in 2022.

·    Reduction of  of $6.0M in sale of  assets including fleet sales.

·    $1.2M of further reductions in interest from investments due to lower interest rates in the market than considered in the 2021/22 budget. Budget considered a weighted average interest rate of 0.63% compared to an actual average of 0.46%.

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.3

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

 

 

 

Response to Notice of Motion 607: Improving Library Services in Wyndham

 

Summary

This report responds to Notice of Motion 607 which was endorsed at the Council Meeting on 25 May 2021.  It provides a summary of the service and asset planning work undertaken to support the delivery of the Library Services Strategy 2018-2040.  Service and infrastructure options outlined in the report have been developed to inform a future affordable network of library services that bring library services closer to the community to meet current and future demand.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Response to Notice of Motion 607: Library Service and Asset Planning Review

 

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Manager Service Planning, Partnering and Reform - Georgie Hill

In providing this advice as the Manager and Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·        Library Services in Wyndham

·        Community Demand and Priorities

·        Library Usage, Access and Catchments

·        Asset and Infrastructure Implications

·        Service and Infrastructure Options to Strengthen the Current Network and Reduce Access Gaps

·        Ongoing affordability and potential funding sources

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

1.   Note the response to Notice of Motion 607: Improving Library Services in Wyndham.

2.   Consider service and infrastructure options when developing the Library Services Strategy Action Plan in 2022.

3.   Continue to advocate for additional funding to support the capital and operational funding for libraries in growth areas.

 

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Jasmine Hill / Marcel Mahfoud

 

That Council:

1.   Note the response to Notice of Motion 607: Improving Library Services in Wyndham.

2.   Consider service and infrastructure options when developing the Library Services Strategy Action Plan in 2022.

3.   Continue to advocate for additional funding to support the capital and operational funding for libraries in growth areas.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

At the Council meeting on 25 May 2021, Notice of Motion 607 was carried:

That Council receive a report on library service and infrastructure planning by the Council Meeting in November 2021, including

a.   an analysis on the accessibility (i.e.  commuting distance and duration) of libraries for all dwellings in Wyndham,

b.   the population serviced by each library as defined by the most accessible library for each dwelling

c.   the capacity of each library as defined by the number of dwellings it is designed to service (limited by foot traffic, or other KPI),

d.   benchmarking of service accessibility and utilisation (capacity versus serviced) against the Victorian average, and

e.   options available to the council to improve areas of Wyndham that fall below the benchmark.

 

LIBRARY SERVICES IN WYNDHAM

The Library Service Strategy 2018-2040 (the Strategy) outlines Wyndham’s strategic direction and commitment to providing library services and assets for the Wyndham community.

As outlined in the Strategy, Wyndham’s Library and Community Learning Service offers five discrete services including: Collections, Information Services, Programs, Technology Access and Spaces.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way our community engages with and accesses services.  Models such as the library delivery service, online collections and programs have created the opportunity to reach further into the community without the reliance on buildings or face to face program delivery. 

Wyndham’s library branch network includes five locations at Hoppers Crossing (Plaza), Werribee, Point Cook, Tarneit and Manor Lakes. The Strategy confirmed the need for an additional four libraries (which were included in the existing Precinct Structure Plans) and used a 3km radius to plan for indicative catchment sizes.

Future sites of library service provision indicated in Wyndham’s Precinct Structure Plans include:

·    Black Forest Road North multipurpose community centre, Mambourin - current delivery date 2026

·    Riverdale multipurpose community centre, Tarneit - current delivery date 2027

·    Tarneit North multipurpose community centre, Tarneit - current delivery date 2029

·    East Werribee Town Centre library, East Werribee Employment Precinct – current delivery date 2030+

The Precinct Structure Plans, which were all developed over five years ago, have predetermined the types of infrastructure and service to be delivered, the size of the land available and the amount of funding that will be contributed from developers. Each of the sites listed above is to be delivered as an integrated community centre offering services such as kindergarten, maternal and child health, library services and small and large indoor and outdoor spaces for community activities.

2.      Relevant Law

Not Applicable.

3.      Discussion

The Library Service Strategy will continue to provide the overarching direction to library service provision in Wyndham.  It provides the framework for this service and asset review which outlines options for a contemporary, flexible and affordable network of services that reduces the reliance on infrastructure and supports new service models to improve equitable service access closer to where people live.  The detailed response to the Notice of Motion is at Attachment 1.

BENCHMARKING AGAINST OTHER VICTORIAN LIBRARY SERVICES

 

An analysis of Wyndham’s library service compared to similar library services was completed to create better understanding of performance against other growth area councils, western metropolitan councils and municipalities of a similar population or physical size, as well as the Victoria average. The analysis provided the following insights:

·    Library users are highly satisfied with Wyndham library services, with high satisfaction ratings compared to other councils across the board.

·    Wyndham’s library service funding per capita is comparable to other growth area councils and municipalities of a similar geographical size, but are still below state average. Significantly, Wyndham currently receives the lowest per capita library funding from State Government of all Victorian municipalities.

·    While the number of Wyndham library branches per capita is below the state average, it is on par with municipalities of a similar geographical size.

·    Wyndham has an opportunity to take advantage of recent technologies to deliver new or expanded services including communication and engagement, digital collections, and diversifying non-computer technologies available to community.

·    Wyndham’s performance results show it sometimes leads the field, sometimes performs on par with the state average, and sometimes trails other library services, illustrating that it (like all other libraries) uses a tailored approach to meet the needs of the local community.

The overarching insight from the benchmarking exercise is that library services vary widely, depending on community priorities, their local context and strategic drivers and adequate funding levels.  This needs to be considered for Wyndham when determining service models and delivery.

 

COMMUNITY DEMAND AND PRIORITIES

Three key pieces of community research were completed to better understand current and future demand for library services in Wyndham, including preferences for access. This included an analysis of demographic information and forecasting and two community surveys to understand user satisfaction and future preferences for service access.

While benchmarking shows that Wyndham’s library service has areas of stronger and weaker performance when compared to other libraries, users are extremely satisfied with how Wyndham’s library services meet their specific needs. The community have told us that they are happy with current access, though they would like flexibility in the way services are offered. A summary of the insights include:

·    High satisfaction and importance placed on library services

·    Willingness to travel up to 15 minutes’ drive from home

·    Existing libraries are popular but there is strong demand from community to access services in a range of ways when and where it suits their personal situation.

·    Safety and convenience are important considerations for using services, including the risk of being exposed to COVID-19, accessible parking and being located close to other amenities and destinations.

·    Strong support for library services to be offered online, in community settings and in activity centres. 

·    There is continued support for home delivery

·    Strong support for extended opening hours of library in the evenings and on weekends. 

·    Strong interest in accessing programs in community centres, library lounges and online.

·    Support for spaces to be available in town centres, library lounge, community centres and close to other amenities.

·    Strongest unmet service needs appear to be programs that support a personal interest or hobby and spaces that can be used casually for leisure pursuits. These are also the two services of strongest interest for future access.

 

LIBRARY USAGE, ACCESS AND CATCHMENTS

There is no single indicator or benchmark that can be used to guide library service planning and service access points.  Wyndham’s unique community and context requires a tailored response to local need. There are multiple elements to consider, including community preferences, proximity, location, usage patterns, accessibility and the amount of floor space made available to the public. All these elements require collective consideration in planning a library network, balanced against affordability and maximising public value.

Analysis shows that the majority of our residents who live within the urban growth boundary can travel to a library branch in 10 minutes in normal day time traffic, allowing for increased traffic and roadworks while still remaining within the 15 minute target. There are two areas, in the urbanised areas of Saltwater and Tarneit West (in the short term), that fall outside of this range currently, as well as the rural areas of Werribee South and Little River.  These gaps can be addressed through targeted service delivery using existing infrastructure, additional programming or by utilising the new library programs van and book lookers, following the evaluation of the recently opened locket at Williams Landing Shopping Centre.

Based on access to floor space, analysis indicates that Werribee, Point Cook and Williams Landing, and Truganina and Tarneit are currently below the target ratio.  The population growth in Williams Landing and Point Cook areas is not expected to be as great as the northern growth frontier of Truganina and Tarneit.  Further projects planned through the Precinct Structure Plans in Truganina and Tarneit are expected to improve the Public Access Floor Space (PAFS) ratio.  Likewise, the deficit in Werribee will be offset by the future library planned in the Precinct Structure Plan for delivery at Black Forest Road North (Mamborin).

While library floor space is one indicator of capacity to deliver library services within an area, other factors will also influence capacity such as opening hours. Areas that have lower ratios of floor space can be supported through alternate service delivery models and provision in surrounding locations.

Leveraging existing council services and infrastructure that are located close to activity centres, amenities and other services, such as Community Centres, will be a cost-effective way of delivering additional library services and programs, particularly in the short-term.

ASSET AND INFRASTRUCTURE IMPLICATIONS

Service planning identifies how, when and where a service is to be delivered based on community demand projections and financial projections, in order to maximise public value. A service-led response focuses first on providing services, with infrastructure provided only as needed to support these services.  The overlay of land use planning considers how the location of supporting infrastructure delivery can align to the strategic land use vision for the municipality.  For example, the positioning of higher order infrastructure (such as libraries) within activity centres, can influence place making and activation of the public realm.

Strategic land use considerations for libraries include:

·    Ensuring the right location for infrastructure with a focus on activity and town centres.

·    Co-location with other civic infrastructure, public transport, and landmarks.

·    Planning to support service integration opportunities.

·    Contributing to place-making and place identity.

·    Identifying opportunities for strengthened urban design.

·    Supporting the characteristics and design aspirations for local communities.

·    Activating activity centres to ensure timely access to services and infrastructure.

The balance between meeting community demand, strategic land use priorities and ongoing affordability is a challenge. The review has determined that there are a number of implications in relation to infrastructure planning that need to be considered in determining the future library services network for Wyndham:

·    In the Precinct Structure Plans (PSPs), four additional library branches are proposed to be integrated in planned community centres. 

·    Developer Contributions and proposed grants that Council is eligible for will be insufficient to deliver the anticipated scope of infrastructure required.

·    At least one flagship library is required for a population the size of Wyndham. No existing library site has the capacity to fill this role.  Consideration of the most appropriate locations and a funding strategy will be required.

·    In the current state, the access gap in Saltwater will not be met by existing or planned library-specific infrastructure in the next 10 years. There is a need to consider alternate solutions together with programming and service responses such as regular visits by the library program van and more efficient use of existing community spaces.

 

SERVICE AND INFRASTRUCTURE OPTIONS TO STRENGTHEN THE CURRENT NETWORK AND REDUCE ACCESS GAPS

 

Service Options

Community research indicates that Wyndham’s existing libraries provide good access to library services across the municipality, with strong community satisfaction. The community has indicated a strong desire to use library services, but there is a wide variation in how people want to access them. 

A service-led response will seek to deliver operational responses to build capacity and fill service gaps. The options available leverage existing workforce, resources and infrastructure, to tailor service delivery for local needs. Importantly it doesn’t rely on just an infrastructure response and therefore, can support Council’s financial sustainability.

These options include:

·    Maximising access through joint programming with other Council services, outreach, extension of hours and online services

·    Maximising efficiency through use of non-library infrastructure such as shopping centre, community centres and pavilions

·    Innovate and diversify services through new technologies, using multiple modes of delivery (ie online, outreach and in branch)

·    Working in partnership with other Council services and partner organisation to broaden reach and create an enhanced customer experience.

 

Infrastructure Options

There are a number of library infrastructure options that provide flexible and agile opportunities to deliver equitable access to library services across Wyndham.  Diversifying the types of infrastructure provided allows for options to be tailored to the needs of the municipality as a whole, as well as the local communities they serve.

Our current network provides two of the six infrastructure options outlined below (branches and lounges).  Most options provide access to all five core library services, they just vary in size and cost.

In November, a book locker was opened at the Williams Landing Shopping Centre and in early 2022, Council will also open a new library hub at the same centre to provide access to a curated collection and programs.  The new Library programs van will also commence in early 2022 and will have scheduled visits across the municipality, focusing particularly on addressing the access gaps in Tarneit West, Saltwater and rural areas by bringing library services closer to where people live.  Adding these options to the Wyndham Library network will provide Council with the opportunity to test and assess community access and support for these new approaches. 

Ongoing consideration is required to assess how the options outlined below can be used to support the growth of the network in the medium to longer term to address current and future demand within the parameters of competing priorities and our Long Term Financial Plan.

 

Options 

Description 

Flagship Library 

 

Icon

Description automatically generated

Large centrally located library within a major activity centre with good access to public transport.  Iconic civic infrastructure that aligns to the strategic land use aspirations for Wyndham and contributes to place-making 

 

Community Learning Centre Library Branch 

 

Icon

Description automatically generated 

Co-located with other complementary uses such as Council services and retail settings.  Most existing libraries are Community Learning Centre Branches. In future, the library component will be fully integrated within community centres to offer functional flexibility for spaces, programs and collections. This means grouping by interests or cohorts – for example, having the children’s collection and program area in the Maternal and Child Health waiting area. 

 

Library Lounge 

A picture containing text, clipart, vector graphics

Description automatically generated 

Integrated in a community centre within an activity centre. A Library Lounge will offer a curated collection, programs and spaces tailored to the community. 

 

Library Hub 

 

Icon

Description automatically generated 

A library hub is a small space designed to meet an access gap.  It can offer a reduced collection and programs and can be used flexibly for other purposes after-hours.  Hubs could be leased spaces in activity centres or within repurposed community centres. 

 

Library Pop-Up Programs Van 

Icon

Description automatically generated 

Allows for Library programs to be delivered in a range of community settings such as community centres and open space to meet service gaps. Scheduling and frequency will respond to community needs. 

 

Book Locker 

 

Icon

Description automatically generated 

Support book collections and returns for library users who have limited access to a nearby access point.  They can be co-located with Library Hubs, community centres or shopping centres. 

 

ONGOING AFFORDABILITY AND POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCES

Public libraries across the state, including in Wyndham, are doing more with less.  The situation is becoming untenable as long-term financial sustainability of services is threatened.  Funding to support the delivery of new assets and the maintenance and renewal of existing assets is limited placing significant pressure on councils to prioritise finite resources. A stronger commitment from the State Government is required to increase operational and capital funding for Wyndham’s libraries.

Locally, service planning and infrastructure delivery must be aligned to support Wyndham’s Long Term Financial Plan.  The affordability of future library infrastructure is dependent on availability of land, size of the building, funding provided through developer contributions and grants, and in what year it is to be delivered.

The primary source of funding for library infrastructure over the next ten years is developer contributions, which are collected for infrastructure within an area, and State Government grants.  Based on current estimates, developer contributions earmarked for the four planned projects will only contribute approximately half of the funding required.  The current State Government grant programs available to support capital for libraries is the Growing Suburbs Fund and Living Libraries Program.  Both programs are limited in the amount that can be accessed and would not be sufficient to cover the difference between Developer Contributions and the estimated cost of the projects. 

Victoria’s Infrastructure Strategy 2021-2051, released in August 2021, includes the following recommendation relating to library infrastructure funding:

‘Recommendation 73: Fund libraries and aquatic centres in growth areas in the next five years, increase funding to support local governments to plan and deliver libraries and aquatic recreation centres in Melbourne’s seven growth area municipalities.’

The strategy recommends that each of Melbourne’s seven growth area local governments should receive from the Victorian Government up to $100,000 for library planning. It also recommends that the Victorian Government should fund up to one-third of the cost of new facilities, capped at $10M, with local governments to provide funding for the remaining capital costs and operational expenses. At this point, the Victorian Government has not responded to the recommendations made by Infrastructure Victoria.

The affordability of a future library services network also needs to consider operating costs, including asset maintenance and renewal, collections renewal, technology requirements, workforce costs utilities and in some cases, leasing costs.  These costs will continue to increase as the network expands.  Current operational funding provided by the State Government is not keeping pace with the demand on service due to the population growth.

4.      Council Plan

Council’s newly adopted Council Plan 2021-25 includes the following action under our commitment to Earning and Learning: A Thriving City:

6.3 Provide opportunities for lifelong learning, through a place-based approach to the management and delivery of neighbourhood hubs and libraries

5.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

The Library Service Strategy 2018 – 2040, outlines Wyndham’s service’s strategic direction and commitment to providing library services and assets for the Wyndham community in a period of continued growth.

6.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

This work is also informed by the ALIA Australian Public Library Alliance (APLA) which is the peak body for public libraries in Australia and People Places; a guide for planning public libraries by the State Library of NSW.

7.      Financial Viability

No financial decisions are required at this point for the Response to Notice of Motion 607: Improving Library Services in Wyndham.

The options outlined in this report will be considered as part of the next five-year Library Services Strategy Action Plan to be developed in 2022 and through future business cases presented to Council as part of annual budget processes.

8.      Sustainability Implications

Not applicable

9.      Options

Service and infrastructure options are outlined in the discussion section.

10.    Community Engagement

Two research methods have been used to engage directly with community to inform the review, attracting over 1,600 responses.

 

1.   Wyndham Library User Survey (971 responses) – the purpose of this survey was to understand current preference of library users and non-users.  It was widely promoted through social media and to library users in July and August.

2.   Community Research Survey (656 responses) – the purpose of the online survey was to understand how our community members would prefer to access each of the five library services. Survey participants were drawn from research panels and from Wyndham’s new People’s Advisory Panel.

Community members will continue to be involved in shaping the future of service and through co-design of service models and infrastructure into the future.

11.    Communication Strategy

Not applicable.

12.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

The service and asset options outlined in this report have considered contemporary and innovative strategies to improve equitable access to a network of libraries services without the unsustainable reliance on traditional infrastructure solutions.

13.    Collaboration

Not applicable.

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Response to Notice of Motion 607: Library Service and Asset Planning Review

 

Item No: 6.5.3

 

 

 

 

 

Response to the Notice of Motion 607:
Libraries Service & Asset Planning Review 

,November 2021
 

 


Contents

Purpose of library service and asset review.. 2

Strategic and legislative context. 2

A snapshot of Wyndham library services. 3

Community demand and priorities. 5

Wyndham library user survey. 6

Community research via survey. 6

Demographic analysis and forecasting. 8

Summary and implications. 9

Access, usage and catchment data. 10

Library use. 10

Access patterns. 11

Catchments by library branch. 13

Catchments: travel time. 16

Library capacities. 17

Summary and implications. 18

Additional considerations. 18

Strategic land use considerations. 18

Flagship Library. 19

Integrated service delivery. 20

Ongoing affordability and funding. 20

Summary. 22

Service and infrastructure responses. 23

Service options. 23

Infrastructure options. 24

Next Steps. 25

 


Purpose of library service and asset review

Service planning work is required to support the delivery of the Library Service Strategy 2018-2040 and ensure that the provision of services is guided by and responsive to growth requirements and community demand.

On 27th May 2021, a notice of motion was passed requesting a report on library service and infrastructure planning by the Council Meeting in November 2021, including:

a.    an analysis on the accessibility (i.e. commuting distance and duration) of libraries for all dwellings in Wyndham,

b.    the population serviced by each library as defined by the most accessible library for each dwelling

c.     the capacity of each library as defined by the number of dwellings it is designed to service (limited by foot traffic, or other KPI),

d.    benchmarking of service accessibility and utilisation (capacity versus serviced) against the Victorian average, and

e.    options available to the council to improve areas of Wyndham that fall below the benchmark.

In response, this report summarises the service planning work that was completed from June to September 2021 to respond to the notice of motion and achieve the following:

·   Review library service planning to support the Library Service Strategy 2018-2040.

·   Better understand how the community want to access and use libraries.

·   Support flexible, affordable, and sustainable service delivery into the future.

·   Provide options based on community demand and feedback.

The work has been guided by the following elements:

·   Clear strategic and legislative context.

·   Evidence of growth, community demand and priorities.

·   Updated library access, usage and catchment data.

·   Strategic land use considerations.

·   Identified service delivery gaps and integrated service delivery opportunities.

·   Assets and infrastructure implications.

·   Ongoing affordability and funding.

Strategic and legislative context

Aligning to the current strategic goals of the organisation is critical in setting context.

Wyndham’s Library Service Strategy 2018-2040 provides the strategic intent and direction for Council’s ongoing provision of contemporary library services and facilities in a period of continued growth. The strategy:

·    Positions Wyndham Libraries to play a key role in Wyndham being a ‘Smart City’.

·    Examines how the libraries, as a vital and valuable community asset, will support the achievement of the Wyndham 2040 Vision.

·    Considers future library service provision across the municipality and will keep local libraries at the forefront of new library developments in technology, infrastructure and service provision.

Wyndham’s new Integrated Strategic Planning, Reporting and Monitoring Framework positions ten-year service and asset planning as a critical part of meeting long-term strategic goals contained in the Council Plan, Long-Term Financial Plan and Asset Management Plan.

This work is also informed by the ALIA Australian Public Library Alliance (APLA) which is the peak body for public libraries in Australia and People Places; a guide for planning public libraries by the State Library of NSW.

A snapshot of Wyndham library services

The Library Service is busy and thriving and supports a wide cross-section of Wyndham’s community in a variety of ways.

Current library branches

There are five dedicated library branches across the City servicing our current population of 302,650. Whilst there has been a reduction of use of libraries over the last 12 months due to COVID-19, all library services remain among the most highly valued and utilised services by the Wyndham community. Customer satisfaction with libraries remains consistently high, with above average ratings when compared to library services in similar municipalities (growth area councils, western metropolitan councils, municipalities of similar area and population), as well as the Victorian average.

Branch

Opening Hours

Co-located services

Users

Collections checked out (20/21)

New user registrations

Hoppers Crossing

M-T: 9:30am - 8pm

W: 9:30am - 6pm

T: 9:30am - 10pm

F: 9:30am - 6pm

Sun: 1:30pm - 5pm

Pacific Werribee

36,985

233,539

1649

Point Cook

M - T: 10am - 6pm

W - T: 10am - 8pm

F: 10am - 6pm

Sun: 1:30pm - 5pm

Community Centre, Kinder, MCH

24,044

332,962

2018

Julia Gillard Library Tarneit

M - T: 9am - 8pm

W - F: 9am - 6pm

Sat: 12pm - 4pm

Community Centre, Kinder, MCH, youth

20,762

180,897

1675

Werribee

M - W: 10am - 6pm

T: 10am - 8pm

F: 10am - 6pm

Sat: 12pm - 4pm

Cultural centre, Art Gallery

10,121

54,261

817

Manor Lakes

M - T: 10am - 6pm

W: 10am - 8pm

T - F: 10am - 6pm

Sat: 12pm - 4pm

Community Centre, Kinder, MCH, youth

9,343

117,213

941

 

Planned library branches

As part of this review, planned infrastructure delivery will be considered to ensure the full library network supports equitable access across the municipality and application of new services models and technology, in order to more efficiently balance community need and long term affordability.

In the short term, a pop-up programs van and library hub at Williams Landing are due to commence operations in early 2022. A book locker within the Williams Landing Shopping Centre recently opened in November.

Four additional library branches of varying size have been included in Precinct Structure Plans in our growth areas for delivery over the next ten years.  These future branches were planned to be co-located and built within planned community centres, allowing the community to access various services in one location.

·    Truganina library lounge at multipurpose community centre - current delivery date early 2024.

·    Riverdale library (Tarneit North) at multipurpose community centre - current delivery date 2027.

·    Black Forest Road North library (Mambourin) at multipurpose community centre - current delivery date 2026.

·    Tarneit North library at multipurpose community centre, Tarneit - current delivery date 2029.

 

The location of these sites and the size of land allocated has been predetermined through the Precinct Structure Planning processes led by the State Government.  This also links to the Developer Contributions that have been collected to put towards the delivery of these sites.  There is little flexibility to move within these set parameters without incurring additional costs for the acquisition of land and delivery of infrastructure.

 

Funding was also committed in a previous Council Budget to scope a library and community centre at Williams Landing. This project was stopped when the COVID-19 pandemic commenced in 2020. Land has not been secured and there are no developer contributions or grants allocated for this project.

There is also a library branch planned for the East Werribee Employment Precinct however this is likely to be further than ten years away from delivery and is subject to State Government commitment to the precinct.

Library services

Wyndham’s Library and Community Learning Service offers five core services to the community, which are predominately delivered through the network of library branches:

1.    Collections: offer physical and digital content and collections, including general, specialist, local studies, heritage and cultural collections.

2.    Information services: support people to identify and access the information, resources and content they need while building their information literacy.

3.    Programs: reading, literacy, learning, wellbeing, cultural and creative programs.

4.    Technology access: access to computers, the internet, printers, scanners and other mainstream technology, as well as support in developing digital literacy.

5.    Spaces: spaces where people can relax, work, meet, learn, connect and create.

Benchmarking against other Victorian library services

An analysis of Wyndham’s library service compared to similar library services was completed to create better understanding of performance against other growth area councils, western metropolitan councils and municipalities of a similar population or physical size, as well as the Victoria average. The analysis provided the following insights:

·    Library users are highly satisfied with Wyndham library services, with high satisfaction ratings compared to other councils across the board.

·    Wyndham’s library service funding per capita is comparable to other growth area councils and municipalities of a similar geographical size, but are still below state average. Significantly, Wyndham currently receives the lowest per capita library funding from State Government of all Victorian municipalities.

·    While the number of Wyndham library branches per capita is below the state average, it is on par with municipalities of a similar geographical size.

·    Wyndham has an opportunity to take advantage of recent technologies to deliver new or expanded services including communication and engagement, digital collections, and diversifying non-computer technologies available to community.

·    Wyndham’s performance results show it sometimes leads the field, sometimes performs on par with the state average, and sometimes trails other library services, illustrating that it (like all other libraries) uses a tailored approach to meet the needs of the local community.

The overarching insight from the benchmarking exercise is that library services vary widely, depending on community priorities, their local context and strategic drivers and adequate funding levels.  This needs to be considered for Wyndham when determining service models and delivery.

Community demand and priorities

Better understanding Wyndham’s growth requirements and the ways in which the unique and diverse community want to use library services is critical to directing future service provision.

Three key pieces of work were conducted in 2021 to provide a comprehensive picture of current and future community demand for library service access in Wyndham. This essential in order to maximise the public benefit while providing an affordable library service. The emerging picture is that of a community that is highly satisfied and engaged with library services, while seeking greater variety in service offerings, and flexibility in how they can be accessed. Common themes and key points have been outlined below.

Wyndham library user survey

Library users are surveyed every two years, to gather information about their use of libraries, level of satisfaction and suggested improvements. A total of 972 community members responded to the online and paper-based survey in July and August 2021, providing the following insights:

·    Most library users are highly satisfied with services provided, with no significant difference according to library branch.

·    Currently, Library users most often access library services at a library branch or online.

·    Three quarters of library users drive to the library, with most of the remainder walking or catching public transport.

·    While individuals’ access and use different services to meet their own needs, the overall mix of services used at different branches is relatively consistent.

 

Community research via survey

Community research was conducted to better understand how Wyndham residents want to be able to access library services in the future.

A representative sample of 656 Wyndham residents, both library users and non-users, responded to an online survey to tell us:

·    Which library services residents want to access, on a service-by-service basis.

·    Factors impacting service access including frequency of use, travel, service location and key considerations.

Overall library service demand

The research identified the following trends:

·    Overall, Wyndham residents are highly interested in accessing services that are provided by libraries. Strongest interests are in accessing spaces and programs, that support personal interests, hobbies and leisure.

·    For many, the library branch remains the first consideration for accessing services, supported by an overall strong interest in online services.

·    People are most likely to drive to access services, with around three quarters of people being willing to drive up to 15 minutes. Relatedly, parking is one of the most consistently important considerations to accessing libraries.

·    Safety and convenience are important considerations for using all services, such as the risk of being exposed to COVID-19, accessible parking and being close to home or another destination.

·    The Wyndham community wants the flexibility to use services when and where it suits their personal situation. No single mode of service delivery will be acceptable to everyone.

·    When asked to describe their ideal library of the future, Wyndham residents believe it requires a more inviting environment with a mix of open and closed spaces, that uses technology for a range of purposes.

Service-by-service demand

Service demands and opportunities based on the research conducted have been summarised below.

Service

Popular options for service provision

Programs

-      Prefer delivery from town centres, online, a library lounge, community centres.

-      Include options for weekday evenings.

-      Important to be close to people’s homes.

Spaces

-      Prefer delivery from town centre, community centres and library lounges.

-      Include options for weekends (mornings and afternoons).

-      Made available for frequent use (at least once per week).

-      People are willing to travel further to access.

-      Important that it’s located near where people are already going, and other amenities.

Collections

-      Options to include online, 24/7 book locker, town centre or home delivery.

-      Important that it’s accessible any time of day, and close to where people are already going.

Technology

-      Prefer delivery from town centre, online, library lounge, community centre.

-      Expanded availability weekday evenings and weekend afternoons.

-      Important that it is accessible any time of day.

Information services

-      Extremely high interest in online service with 81% of respondents likely to access this.

-      Prefer delivery from town centre, library lounges, community centres, shopping centres.

-      Important that it’s close to home, provides the latest resources and information, library staff are available.

 

Overall, library branches should continue to be Wyndham’s primary mode of service delivery. Community feedback indicated that residents should be located within a 15-minute drive of a library branch in metropolitan areas. It also indicated a high interest in supplementary service delivery methods, to meet the different needs of our residents and fill service gaps.

 

I think more opening hours would be helpful – students like me want to access the library after school.,Libraries should be outside our homes, community based and user friendly.,More visibility about library services would be ideal.,Provide isolated workstations / booths with internet access people can work in privacy where they can book via website. This is good for people in the community that needs to do online meetings.

,A multifunctional space that can be reconfigured for different uses. A space that can host interactive learning for people physically present but also those joining online.

 

 

 

 

 

Have a dedicated phone number for senior clients to call to enquire about services.

 


Quotes from respondents to the Wyndham Library User Survey, 2021

Demographic analysis and forecasting

Wyndham’s growth has and will continue to be high over the next 10 years+, triggering a challenge for Council in how to service increasing needs and expectations and ensure ongoing affordability. This growth is concentrated in Tarneit, Truganina, Manor Lakes, Wyndham Vale and Werribee over the next 10 years to 2031, with Tarneit, Manor Lakes and Werribee continuing to see significant increase in population until 2041.

Population summary

City of Wyndham

Forecast year

2021 to 2031

2031 to 2041

Locality

2021

2026

2031

2036

2041

people

%

people

%

Hoppers Crossing

39,697

39,231

39,136

39,271

39,682

-561

-1

546

1

Little River - Rural West

908

1,146

2,839

4,344

5,196

1,931

213

2,357

83

Manor Lakes

10,087

17,294

25,608

36,652

41,455

15,521

154

15,847

62

Point Cook

68,088

72,283

76,443

80,283

82,085

8,355

12

5,642

7

Tarneit

53,707

71,883

91,205

115,172

131,161

37,498

70

39,956

44

Truganina

37,574

48,644

52,220

53,581

52,803

14,646

39

583

1

Werribee

55,851

66,494

75,602

83,728

98,900

19,751

35

23,298

31

Werribee South

2,835

3,091

3,181

3,262

3,334

346

12

153

5

Williams Landing - Laverton North

10,238

12,056

12,695

12,478

12,302

2,457

24

-393

-3

Wyndham Vale

23,665

32,041

38,431

40,625

45,671

14,766

62

7,240

19

City of Wyndham

302,650

364,162

417,361

469,396

512,591

114,711

38

95,230

23

Source: Population and household forecasts, 2016 to 2041, prepared by .id (informed decisions), November 2019.

 

The Australia Bureau of Statistics has published information on who is most likely to use and to value libraries in Australia.

·    Younger people are more likely to access library services, including children, young people and younger adults.

·    People with children are highly likely to describe libraries as ‘very important’ for their children.

·    People from higher socioeconomic backgrounds and with higher educational attainment are more likely to value libraries.

·    People not employed visit more often than those in employment.

Demographically, the majority of these characteristics are associated with growth area suburbs (Truganina, Tarneit, Wyndham Vale, Manor Lakes) compared with established suburbs (Werribee, Hoppers Crossing, Werribee South), indicating an overall higher demand for libraries in growth areas now and into the future (as indicated by yellow highlighting)

 

Established areas

Growth areas

Growth

- Low or negative

- High

Age profile

- Older age profile

- People ageing in place

 

- Younger age profile

- More young children and parents in the 25-34-year age.

Household composition

- Higher rate of couples without dependents and lone person households

- Below average household size

- Higher rate of couple families with dependent children

- Above average household sizes

 

Socioeconomic status*

- Lower SEIFA score

- Average to higher SEIFA score

Education

- Fewer tertiary qualified people

- More tertiary qualified people

Cultural and linguistic diversity

- Higher rates of English mono-lingual people

 

 

- Higher rates of multi-lingualism and languages other than English spoken in the home.

- Greater proportions of people born overseas

Data from population .id (2021)  *SEIFA data from Australian Bureau of Statistics (2016)

Summary and implications

Wyndham’s existing library network does an excellent job of meeting the needs of many Wyndham residents. Meeting the changing needs of a growing community in a financially responsible manner requires innovative thinking. Supplementing this network with varied models of service delivery will support broader access and more fully meet the full diversity of community needs. However, the demand for additional points of access through new infrastructure needs to be balanced with the network being affordable and sustainable. 

Key findings include:

Infrastructure considerations

·    Most people to be within 15 minutes’ drive of their nearest service delivery point, in normal daytime traffic, excluding areas outside the urban growth boundary.

Non-infrastructure considerations

·    Improve access to spaces and programs that support leisure and personal interests. These should be accessible and can be provided by libraries and non-library services, from library branches or other locations such as community centres, library lounges and town centres.

·    Expand virtual delivery of services, particularly information services.

·    Ensure services and spaces are flexible to support the diverse needs of different library users.

·    More access outside standard business hours including longer opening on weekends and evenings, 24/7 and on-demand service delivery methods that don’t require staff presence.

Access, usage and catchment data

Library access and use is highly dependent on characteristics of the library branch itself, like location, design and opening hours rather than being determined by simple proximity.

There is no single indicator or benchmark that can be used to guide library service planning. Traditionally, population triggers or distance have been used to assist in planning.  Recently, Infrastructure Victoria published the “Background Paper – Social Infrastructure in Melbourne’s New Growth Areas” (September 2021).  This paper compared the number of libraries provided to population levels in local governments across the state.  It estimates that Wyndham has one library branch per 60,000 residents, compared to the state average of one per 41,000 residents.  This was a similar result for other growth Councils but isn’t the ideal basis for service planning.

Based on feedback from the community, a more nuanced approach is required when considering service access.  There are multiple elements to factor in, including community preferences for how they want to use and access the service, proximity to home and common destinations, co-location with other services, how easily the service is accessed and the amount of space that is available to the public. All these elements require collective consideration.

The information presented in this section shows that the library branches that are most accessible to Wyndham’s residents, are those that are in a convenient location within an acceptable travel distance. The ability of libraries to deliver services to its users varies across individual branches, however access and usage can be increased by extending service opening hours, offering flexible service locations, delivering services using non-traditional methods and by increasing the access and quality of online services.

Library use

The following image shows the rates of library-using households across the municipality in 2019. It shows households with an active library user, as a proportion of total number of households. The higher the proportion, the brighter the colour.

Map

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Map: Proportion of households with one or more active library users 2019

 

The following patterns were identified:

·    High rates of library use in the growth areas that ring Wyndham’s established areas.

·    Lower rates in both established and rural areas.

·    Rates of usage aren’t strongly correlated with proximity to a library branch, particularly around Werribee, Hoppers Crossing and Point Cook libraries.

This aligns with previous demographic analysis, which indicated higher demand for libraries in growth areas.

Access patterns

The following images show active library users who used their library card in 2019. This relates to borrowing of collections (physical or virtual) and use of computer/technology services.

Note: 2019 data used due to 2020/21 data not being representative of normal library usage patterns.

Map: Library user access patterns (2019)

Wyndham’s five library branches are denoted by a coloured triangle, with households with an active library user identified by a corresponding coloured dot.

The coloured dots broadly cluster together in catchments around each library branch, indicating a tendency of library users to use a branch closest to them.

However, viewing users of each library branch in isolation (below) provides a more informative view of how Wyndham residents use the different branches.

Catchments by library branch

Map

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Map: Library user access patterns Werribee Library (2019)

 

Map

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Map: Library user access patterns Hoppers Crossing Library (2019)

 

Map

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Map: Library user access patterns Point Cook Library (2019)

 

Map

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Map: Library user access patterns Manor Lakes Library (2019)

 

Map

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Map: Library user access patterns Julia Gillard Library Tarneit (2019)

 

These maps provide the following insights:

·    Manor Lakes and Tarneit libraries have the most tightly-defined catchments, with fewest users from outside their catchment.

·    Werribee and Point Cook libraries also have quite defined catchments, however with a greater number of users from across Wyndham.

·    Hoppers Crossing Library has a broad catchment from across Wyndham.

·    Wyndham’s rural areas do not have their own library catchment and have not been included on this diagram. Analysis shows that most rural library users visit Hoppers Crossing or Werribee library, with a significant number using Point Cook. Visits from rural residents aligns with those library branches located in major activity centres.

This indicates that:

·    Library branches with the most clearly defined catchments and least broad reach are located in growth areas, in more residential areas.

·    Library branches that are located in a major activity centres (Point Cook and Werribee) are associated with a greater distribution of library users.

·    Hoppers Crossing Library is located at Pacific Werribee and houses the special collections. This major shopping centre draws people from across Wyndham, supported by excellent public transport access. This is reflected in the Wyndham-wide catchment for this library branch.

·    Provision of library branches in major activity centres, maximises access and use of library services, most effectively meeting community need and achieving public value.

Catchments: travel time

As indicated in the library services community research, ensuring that most people are within 15 minutes’ drive of their nearest service delivery point in normal daytime traffic, will meet the access requirements of the majority of Wyndham residents in the urban areas. This level of service access to bring library services closer to where people live will be enhanced by flexible, outreach and targeted responses.

A spatial analysis was conducted of driving time to existing library branches:

·    Rings of progressively darkening colour define drive time to a library branch as 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes.

·    An ideal travel time of 10 minutes is an appropriate benchmark, as this allows a travel buffer for heavier traffic over time, roadworks and other delays.

·    Grey shading represents residential areas of Wyndham.

Map

Description automatically generated

Map: Service access gap based on travel time in normal day-time traffic.

 

Most urban areas fall within a 10 minutes’ drive (in normal weekday, daytime traffic) of a library branch, with the exception of:

·    The south-east Point Cook (Saltwater)

·    Tarneit West

The Tarneit West access gap will be serviced by the planned Riverdale library, so meeting service needs prior to that may require a flexible solution.  The south east of Point Cook remains the only urban residential area with travel times that exceed 10 minutes with no planned infrastructure solution through the current Precinct Structure Plans. Non-infrastructure service and program responses, such as the pop-up program van will be able to assist in reducing the access barrier in the short-term.

A small number of residences in Mount Cottrell that are on the edge of the growth frontier have a longer drive as do other more rural areas of the municipality in Werribee South and Little River.  These areas will also require flexible solutions to bring library services closer to where they live.

Library capacities

Traditionally, the capacity of libraries to provide services and meet need is based on the ratio of Public Access Floor Space (PAFS) to the population.

·    People Places strategic library planning document outlines a target of 28sqm of public access floor space per 1000 population.

·    The Wyndham Library Service Strategy outlined a target for Wyndham of 26-28sqm PAFS/1000 population.

·    Wyndham’s current PAFS ratio is 16 sqm PAFS/1000 population.

However, there are several additional factors to consider:

·    Wyndham is beginning to provide outreach to improve access to library services, such as online service delivery, a 24/7 book locker and a popup library programs van. These services increase library access without a corresponding increase in PAFS.

·    Wyndham’s Community Centres provide spaces, programs, some technology and information services. This overlap can help to meet some of the demand for library services, without contributing towards PAFS.

·    Non-council infrastructure can be used to support access to library services, including schools, pop-up workspaces and parks.

·    Increasing operating hours of libraries will increase the total number of library hours and provision of services, without a corresponding increase in PAFS.  This would impact on staffing costs rather than capital investment.

·    Information on PAFS isn’t collated for Victoria Public Libraries, so benchmarking against other municipal library services is not possible.

Whilst PAFS remains a useful indicator to forecast the capacity of library infrastructure to meet demand across Wyndham as a whole, and in library catchment areas, the calculations do not consider spatial relationships and should be understood in combination with mapping, an analysis of real-life usage patterns and the community preferences around service delivery.

An analysis has calculated the PAFS for each of Wyndham’s library catchments (estimation based on planned infrastructure). Suburbs have been grouped to their nearest library branch.  There is not a library branch in all suburbs.

 

Population in 2021

Publicly Accessible Floor Space

PAFS Ratio

Hoppers Crossing

39,697

1321

33

Werribee

55,850

483

9

Manor Lakes and Wyndham Vale

33,753

856

25

Point Cook and Williams Landing

78,323

1032

13

Truganina and Tarneit

91,281

1225

13

TOTAL

302,648

4917

16

 

Based on PAFS alone, this indicates that Werribee, Point Cook and Williams Landing, and Truganina and Tarneit are currently below the target ratio.  The population growth in Williams Landing and Point Cook areas is not expected to be as great as the northern growth frontier of Truganina and Tarneit.  Further projects planned in Truganina and Tarneit are expected to improve the PAFS ratio.  Likewise, the deficit in Werribee will be offset by the future library planned for delivery at Black Forest Road North.

Summary and implications

Some key points of library access, usage and catchment data:

·    There is no universally accepted benchmark to guide library service planning.  Library use and access is determined by a mix of library location, proximity to residences and common destinations, and convenience for the patron. Individuals will use the library service that is most appropriate for their own circumstances.

·    Most residences fall within an acceptable travel time of a library, with two pockets (Saltwater and Tarneit West – short term) able to be supported through targeted and flexible service delivery.

·    While library floor space is one way to view the capacity of library services within a catchment area, other factors can be considered to boost this (such as longer opening hours, online services and promotions of programs). Library catchment areas with lower ratios of floor space can be supported to achieve this.

·    Leveraging existing Council services and infrastructure that is located close to activity centres, amenities and other services (such as Community Centres) will be a cost-effective way of delivering library services.

These points can be used to help balance the community priorities outlined previously, with the need to deliver an affordable and cost-effective library services over the next 10 years and beyond.

Additional considerations

Strategic land use considerations

There is an important relationship between service planning and strategic land use planning. For libraries, the review and planning of service and infrastructure delivery requires consideration and alignment with land use plans. In particular; Precinct Structure Plans which provide the blueprint for future development and investment, Urban Design Frameworks and The Wyndham Plan which will set the long-term direction for sustainable and aspirational development in Wyndham within the Urban Growth Boundary.

 

Strategic land use considerations for libraries include:

·    Ensuring the right location for infrastructure with a focus on activity and town centres.

·    Co-location with other civic infrastructure, public transport, and landmarks.

·    Planning to support more integrated and efficient service delivery.

·    Planning that contributes to place-making and place identity.

·    Identifying opportunities for strengthened urban design.

·    Supporting the characteristics and design aspirations for local communities.

·    Activating activity centres to support timely service access.

 

Library services play a key role in supporting, connecting and strengthening the community and can contribute to the development and enhancement of local areas, so all of the above elements require consideration. The data presented in this report which demonstrates demand and priorities for library services has been considered together with advice provided by Wyndham’s Strategic Land Use Planning team to ensure there is alignment in future planning.

Flagship Library

The value of a flagship library is well documented in other municipalities and a least one is warranted given Wyndham’s projected growth.  Flagship libraries would be substantially larger than the current branches and would offer a greater range of spaces, services and programs.  It is anticipated that any flagship libraries would service the whole municipality as a destination, and therefore the siting will need to consider access to active and public transport and be located in areas strategically aligned to Wyndham’s land-use planning vision.

Werribee is currently positioned as the City Centre of Wyndham and could be further explored as a potential location for a future flagship library. The current location and size of the Werribee Library is incongruent with the strategic land use planning aspirations of Werribee, and the future of the Werribee Library is dependent on further strategic planning and the future expansion of the Cultural Centre.

There is a strategic opportunity to explore an alternative location for a flagship library at East Werribee/ Hoppers Crossing which would support the future needs at that location. The East Werribee Precinct Structure Plan includes a library as part of the future town centre adjacent to the justice precinct and land will be allocated to support its delivery.  If it is determined that a flagship library should be located within East Werribee, developer contributions will be available to contribute to the library cost.

From a strategic land use planning perspective, there is also merit in considering locating a flagship library near the Hoppers Crossing train station and activity centre.  An investment of this scale would support Council’s aspirations for the development of that precinct as a strategically important activity centre.

To service the northern growth areas, the Riverdale site where a library and community centre is already included in the Precinct Structure Plan would be ideally located to offer a dedicated children’s flagship library.  This would service the demographics of the area which is predominately made up of young families and would act as a catalyst and civic precinct for the activity centre.

Regardless of the positioning, the addition of one or more flagship libraries would provide an opportunity to complement our contemporary library network, giving customers access to cutting edge technologies, resources, special and larger collections and spaces within an accessible and central location. Creative, iconic architecture can also create a sense of place and identity, attract regional interest and can invigorate not only its local area but also the entire municipality. The placement and funding strategy of a flagship library does require further strategic consideration.

Integrated service delivery

Library service planning presents an opportunity to further Wyndham’s progression in delivering more integrated services. The library branches that are planned to be delivered over the next ten years are positioned within multi-use community centres. While the co-location alone of various services can make access easier for the community, there is an opportunity to be more integrated in their delivery. Rethinking service delivery and considering the connections between Wyndham’s library services and other Council services such as kindergartens, maternal and child health services and community spaces can create a more seamless and convenient customer experience. This would enable services and spaces to be grouped by user and function, as well as more creative use of spaces. So we could see early years library collections located in maternal and child heath waiting rooms and playgroup spaces, quiet study spaces located near counselling or multifaith rooms, library books available to borrow while having a coffee from the Centre café or kitchenette, and library programs run in outdoor spaces with access to community centre amenities. As well as more efficient use of space, this supports library users to connect with and use a broader range of spaces, programs and activities provided by non-library services, a need highlighted in the community research survey.

Ongoing affordability and funding

The balance between meeting community demand and expectations and affordability is a challenge, especially in a strong period of growth. Reliable service planning can directly assist with this and must support Wyndham’s new Long-Term Financial Plan which outlines the financial modelling for the next ten years. The affordability of future library infrastructure is dependent on availability of land, size of the building, funding provided through developer contributions and grants, and in what year it is delivered.

Developer contributions

The primary funding sources for the provision of library infrastructure over the next 10 years is developer contributions which are collected for specific projects, and also State Government grants.

Whilst funding for the planned library services to be delivered at Riverdale, Black Forest Road North and Tarneit North have been used to inform the Long-Term Financial Plan, the amounts represent the total costs of the planned multi-purpose community centres which the libraries are a portion of. The Developer Contributions and grants assumed for these projects will not be sufficient to meet the estimated costs to deliver the centres and therefore additional funding will be required to support their delivery.

Based on current estimates, developer contributions earmarked for these projects are currently planned to service approximately half of the cost for these planned community centres. Developer contributions can be redistributed in certain circumstances where two projects are covered by the same Developer Contribution Plan.  An example of this is Tarneit North and Riverdale.

 

Government grants

For each of the future community centres, the Building Blocks Partnership Agreement between Council and the State Government will provide $3M for the kindergarten component.  Other potential grant opportunities include the Living Libraries Fund (up to $1.5M through an annual grant program), and the Growing Suburbs Fund (up to $7.5M across all projects, not traditionally more than $3M per project).  The Growing Suburbs Fund is currently not a recurrent funding program and is subject to budget provision annually.  More recently, the Growing Suburbs Fund has expanded eligibility to peri-urban councils who are not faced with the same infrastructure growth challenges as municipalities like Wyndham.

Victoria’s Infrastructure Strategy 2021-2051 released in August 2021 includes the following recommendation relating to library infrastructure funding:

‘Recommendation 73: Fund libraries and aquatic centres in growth areas in the next five years, increase funding to support local governments to plan and deliver libraries and aquatic recreation centres in Melbourne’s seven growth area municipalities.’

The strategy recommends that each of Melbourne’s seven growth area local governments should receive from the Victorian Government up to $100,000 for library planning. It also recommends that the Victorian Government should also fund up to one-third of the cost of new facilities, capped at $10M, with local governments to provide funding for the remaining capital costs and operational expenses. At this point, the Government has not responded to the recommendations.

Operating costs

Viewing the cost of planned infrastructure alone presents a risk, as ongoing operating costs and revenue are important factors to consider when planning a network of services. Operating costs include asset maintenance and renewal, collections renewal, technology requirements, workforce costs and utilities, and in some cases leasing costs. The more the network expands through the creation of new assets, the higher the budget required to service the assets will become.

Current operational funding for library services from the Victorian Government is insufficient to keep up with demand impacted by population growth. Public libraries across the state are doing more with less, the situation is becoming untenable as long-term financial sustainability of services is threatened. In 2020-2021, the State Government contributed only 14.69% of the overall funding required to operate Wyndham’s Libraries, and Council contributed 85.31%.

The Long-Term Financial Plan includes some general assumptions to estimate future operating costs based on current costs including increases for population and CPI.  

Summary

Delivering a contemporary library network for the Wyndham community requires flexibility and an approach that is financially sustainable and based on meeting current and future service needs, not just delivering infrastructure.

Building on a strong network

Wyndham’s existing library branches do an excellent job of providing access to library services across the municipality, with strong community satisfaction. There is a strong desire to use library services, but a wide variation in how people want to access them. Library branches are the most popular way of accessing library services, but they should not be relied on as the only method.

Planning considerations for flexible, affordable models of service delivery

Whilst there are indicators to guide the planning and delivery of library services and infrastructure, there is no one preferred model. Wyndham requires a model which is tailored to its community and considers community preferences and demand as a priority, balanced with other considerations including strategic land use planning, integrated service delivery options, affordability, advocacy and funding opportunities and ultimately, libraries’ role in a thriving municipality.

An approach that challenges our traditional way of thinking is critical and looks beyond the immediate future. A public library’s service offerings can be delivered in different ways to expanded user groups in different places at different times, while remaining cost-effective. Traditional and well-loved branch libraries staffed by welcoming, knowledgeable and skilled professionals can be complemented by cost-effective online and outreach services that take the library out and into the community to increase access and reach.

Addressing gaps in the network

Delivery of the planned library branches in the Precinct Structure Plans will increase access to floor space for an overall effective level of service provision to Wyndham. However, all planned infrastructure in the next ten years is to be delivered in the north-western and western growth fronts. Based on service planning, these three projects (Black Forest Road North, Riverdale and Tarneit North), may not all be required to service this part of the municipality if non-infrastructure solutions such as extended opening hours, library programs van and outreach models are employed. Further work is required to consider the future placement, size and funding strategy of the planned library branches so they meet community need in a financially sustainable way.

To the east in Truganina, Williams Landing and Point Cook, innovative solutions to bridge minor service access gaps are required including the use of flexible, non-infrastructure solutions like online service, utilisation of existing spaces within Council and partner infrastructure, book locker, pop-up van and inclusion of the library lounge as part of Truganina Community Centre.

Partnerships

Libraries are increasing their partnerships and alliances with community, education, government and business organisations to leverage resources and broaden access for a wide range of users. This can strengthen the community experience and help to achieve strategic land use goals and more integrated service delivery. Working closely with the State Government on funding and grant opportunities is also a key action that requires focus and will be essential to deliver an affordable, enhanced network of services that meets long-term community demand and priorities.

Service reimagining

Data demonstrates that a move away from just delivering a network of branches to a more cohesive service network, where the collective value of the network is considered. This can provide more flexibility and innovation in the way the services are delivered in person and online.

 

Service and infrastructure responses

Service options

A wide range of responsive service options will best meet the needs of Wyndham’s diverse community and provide public value.

Understanding the service needs of the community is essential to planning to meet service delivery gaps.  The options must leverage existing workforce, resources and infrastructure, to tailor service delivery for local needs. Importantly they don’t rely, in the first instance, on more costly infrastructure solutions.

·    Maximise access to existing services:

Outreach services to create new access points for library services.

Joint programming with other areas of City Life.

Services provided from convenient and non-library locations.

Extending library hours and providing services outside of business hours.

Online services that can be accessed from anywhere, at any time.

·    Maximise efficiency of the library network. Options include:

Coordinate planning of the library network to build on existing strengths and resources.

Use non-library infrastructure to deliver library services, including community centres, sports pavilions and open space.

·    Innovate and diversify services:

Provide services in new and creative ways to meet emerging needs

Use technology to support service delivery

Services should use multiple modes of delivery to cater to different cohorts and communities.

·    Work together

Partner with organisations and agencies to reduce duplication and strengthen connections.

Integrate service delivery across council for seamless delivery of similar services for similar audiences.

Engage with community and co-design local responses to local needs.


 

Infrastructure options

There are flexible and varied ways to deliver infrastructure to bring library services closer to community.  These can be tailored to the municipality, as well as responsive to local community needs.

The six infrastructure options are presented below as a hierarchy to demonstrate the variety of options available to support service delivery, affordability and flexibility. The purpose of these options to bring library services closer to the community, in places where they have said they want to access them.  Our current network is providing two of these six infrastructure options, however the book locker, library hub and programs van have recently commenced or are planned to commence in early 2022. 

Most options below provide access to all five core library services, they just vary in size and cost. The costs included are high-level indicative estimates for building costs (one-off) and ongoing operating costs. Note this is just the library cost only (not costs for an entire community centre) and does not include developer contributions, state or grant funding.

 

Options

Description

Flagship Library

 

Large centrally located library within a major activity centre with good access to public transport.  Iconic civic infrastructure that aligns to the strategic land use aspirations for Wyndham and contributes to place-making

 

Build - $30-40M, Opex - $4-5M, Floor Space – 3,500-4,500sqm

Community Learning Centre Library Branch

 

Co-located with other complementary uses such as Council services and retail settings.  Most existing libraries are Community Learning Centre Branches. In future, the library component will be fully integrated within community centres to offer functional flexibility for spaces, programs and collections. This means grouping by interests or cohorts – for example, having the children’s collection and program area in the Maternal and Child Health waiting area.

 

Build - $6-7M (just library), Opex – $1.4-1.7M, Floor Space – 1,200-1,400sqm

Library Lounge

Integrated in a community centre within an activity centre. A Library Lounge will offer a curated collection, programs and spaces tailored to the community.

 

Build - $3-6M, Opex – $700K-1.4M, Floor Space –  600-1,200sqm

Library Hub

 

A library hub is a small space designed to meet an access gap.  It can offer a reduced collection and programs and can be used flexibly for other purposes after-hours.  Hubs could be leased spaces in activity centres or within repurposed community centres.

 

Build - $400K-$600K, Opex - $300K-350K), Floor Space – 140-200sqm

Library Pop-Up Programs Van

Allows for Library programs to be delivered in a range of community settings such as community centres and open space to meet service gaps. Scheduling and frequency will respond to community needs.

 

Build - $162K, Opex - $170K

Book Locker

 

Support book collections and returns for library users who have limited access to a nearby access point.  They can be co-located with Library Hubs, community centres or shopping centres.

 

Build - $50K, Opex - $8K

 

Next Steps

 

The next five-year Library Service Strategy Action Plan will be developed in 2022.  It is proposed that options outlined in this report be considered for inclusion. The following actions will commence in the short term:

·    Proceed with immediate planned projects to be operational in 2022:

Williams Landing Hub

Pop-up Library Programs Van

·    Undertake operational planning within City Life to increase access to library services through non-infrastructure responses, particularly in Tarneit West and Saltwater.

·    Develop business cases for upcoming projects to consider as part of the annual budget process.

·    Advocate to the State Government to implement the recommendation in the Infrastructure Victoria Strategy to fund a third of library capital in growth areas.

·    Apply for grants to support delivery of future projects.

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.4

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

 

 

 

Naming of New Community Centres in Truganina South East and Tarneit North

 

Summary

This report recommends that Council endorse the name “Koomail Tardy” for the new community centre being constructed at Alcock Road, Truganina; and the name “Bembit Bag-rook” for the new community centre being constructed at Polly Parade, Tarneit. Both centres are due to be open in 2022 and will deliver kindergarten, maternal and child health and other family services.

Once endorsed, the name will be submitted to Geographic Names Victoria (GNV) to continue with the formal naming process that includes a 42-day community engagement period.

 

Attachments

Nil

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Manager Service Planning, Partnering and Reform - Georgie Hill

In providing this advice as the Manager, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Social Infrastructure - Andrew Mitchell

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

Geographic Names Victoria’s ‘Naming rules for places in Victoria’ (2016) stipulates the formal process for naming roads, features and localities in Victoria. Once a name has been chosen a 30-day legislated community consultation is required before it is required to be formally submitted to GNV for gazettal and official registration of the name.

 

Given the community consultation period will extend over the Christmas and New Year Period GNV has recommended a 42-day consultation period on this occasion.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council:

1.       Endorse the name “Koomail Tardy” for the new community centre being constructed at Alcock Road, Truganina for submission to Geographic Naming Victoria to continue with the legislated naming process.

2.       Endorse the name “Bembit Bag-rook” for the new community centre being constructed at Polly Parade, Tarneit for submission to Geographic Naming Victoria to continue with the legislated naming process.

 

 

 

MOTION

 

CRS Jennie Barrera / Jasmine Hill

 

That Council:

1.       Endorse the name “Koomail Tardy” for the new community centre being constructed at Alcock Road, Truganina for submission to Geographic Naming Victoria to continue with the legislated naming process.

2.       Endorse the name “Bembit Bag-rook” for the new community centre being constructed at Polly Parade, Tarneit for submission to Geographic Naming Victoria to continue with the legislated naming process.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

The naming process is governed by the ‘Naming Rules for Places in Victoria’ (2016) with Council’s own Geographic Naming Policy (2017) adding local context and Council endorsed naming priorities. These priorities include the use of gender diversity and indigenous names.

 

Two new community centres are being constructed currently to open in 2022; one in Truganina and the other in Tarneit. Both centres will provide integrated family services including kindergarten, maternal and child health and other related services. 

 

A name is required to identify each within Council’s expanding the network of community facilities. The proposed names are consistent with Council’s Geographic Naming Policy and the GNV’sNaming rules for places in Victoria’ (2016).  The following criteria has been considered:

·    Unique name that reflects its purpose and location.

·    Align with key Council strategic statements and policies (including Geographic Naming Policy, Towards Equality and the Reconciliation Action Plan).

·    Proportionate to the category of community infrastructure.

·    Consistency to connect place and make sense of location.

·    Diversity and history of Wyndham.

·    Relevance to the site.

 

Council Officers have consulted with the Bunurong Land Council Aboriginal Corporation (BLCAC), the Registered Aboriginal Party for the land on which they are being built, to identify suitable names. The BLCAC has explicit terms of engagement whereby they will only support requests for naming where no other naming options are being considered.

 

Officers reached out to BLCAC in September and provided background and context to the naming request including site information, vision and purpose of the facilities being built. BLCAC responded with a proposed name for each facility.

2.      Relevant Law

In accordance with the Geographic Place Names Act 1998 (the Act), ‘Naming rules for places in Victoria, statutory requirements for naming roads, features and localities’ (2016) and Council’s Geographic Naming Policy (2017), Council is the naming authority for this infrastructure. 

The ‘Naming rules for place in Victoria’ uphold the guidelines in the Act and are mandatory for naming authorities.  Exemption requests to principles H (Using commemorative names) and I (Using commercial and business names) outlined in the rules must be sought prior to commencing any public consultation or reaching a decision on the final naming process.

3.      Discussion

The Bunurong Land Council Aboriginal Corporation (BLCAC) acknowledged Council’s language request and their cultural heritage and language team determined the following names for the new centres as follows:

 

Truganina South East Family Centre:   Koomail Tardy
Koomail – Grass used for weaving
Tardy - sister

Tarneit North Family Centre:   Bembit Bag-rook
Bembit – Flower
Bag-rook – women

 

Pre -Approval by Geographic Naming Victoria
Pre-approval has been sought and granted by GNV for the use of these names. While this process does not pre-empt final approval, it does indicate the GNV will not object to the names under their naming guidelines or policy.

 

Timelines

GNV has stipulated a public exhibition period of 42 days. This is longer than the usual 30 days given that part of the exhibition phase will occur over the Christmas and New Year period.  Based on, this it is anticipated that community consultation will run until mid-January and a report will be presented to the Council Meeting in February 2022 for final approval. GNV will then require a further two to four weeks to approve and gazette the names.

4.      Council Plan

2.1 Actively recognise and celebrate the First Nations People, their heritage and acknowledge them as the traditional owners of Wyndham

5.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

Geographic Naming Policy 2017

The Geographic Naming Policy provides a consistent approach to geographic naming requests and ensures that all Wyndham features, localities and roads are appropriately named whilst preserving its history. The policy identifies the key considerations for Council when deliberating on geographic naming requests.

The following principles must be used in conjunction with the relevant statutory requirements related to the naming of roads, features and localities. They are consistent with the GNV naming rules and are designed to ensure no ambiguity, confusion, errors or discrimination are caused by the naming, renaming or boundary change process:

·    Ensuring public safety;

·    Recognising public interest;

·    Linking the name to a place;

·    Ensuring names are not duplicated;

·    Names must not be discriminatory;

·    Recognition and use of Indigenous Australian names;

·    Dual names;

·    Using commemorative names;

·    Using commercial and business names;

·    Language;

·    Directional names to be avoided;

·    Assigning extent to a road, feature or locality;

The naming themes, as outlined in Council’s Geographic Naming Policy 2017, have been considered in arriving at the preferred name.  These are:

·    location (including locality and road names);

·    Aboriginal heritage and language;

·    prior uses of the land and the people associated with it;

·    local flora and fauna;

·    significant contributors to the community who are deceased including women;

·    social and historical events;

·    historical exploration and settlement; and

·    recognition of cultural diversity in Wyndham.

The policy states that names are only to be used outside the above themes upon discretion and where it is necessary to do so.

Reconciliation Action Plan 2017-2019

The Reconciliation Action Plan includes a commitment to incorporating Aboriginal place-names and languages in infrastructure projects.

6.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Geographic Place Names Act 1998, ‘Naming rules for places in Victoria’ (2016).

7.      Financial Viability

Financial costs associated with the naming process are included in the project budget

 

There are minor additional cost implications such as temporary identification signage for the building should the building open prior to a formal name being adopted.

8.      Sustainability Implications

Not applicable

9.      Options

Not applicable

10.    Community Engagement

Should the names be endorsed, it is proposed that the formal legislated consultation process as part of Geographic Naming Victoria requirement occur between 3 December 2021 and 14 January 2022. This process allows for community input that will be presented back to Council to inform the final decision.

11.    Communication Strategy

The formal consultation as part of the GNV process will be promoted utilising the following channels:

·    Public notice;

·    Social media platforms;

Existing networks in the Point Cook and broader community

12.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Not applicable

13.    Collaboration

Not applicable

 

 

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No: 00

 

 

Item No: 6.5.5

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

 

 

 

Wyndham Accessibility Action Plan Year 2 Progress Report

 

Summary

The Wyndham Accessibility Action Plan 2019-2022 (the Plan) seeks to increase the access, inclusion and equitable participation of people with disability across the municipality.  The vision of the Plan is that people with disability, their families and/or carers experience in all aspects of their daily lives the same dignity, respect and access to opportunities and services as everyone else.  This annual report is to note the progress of the actions in removing barriers to participation, promoting inclusion and achieving real changes in attitudes and practices that impact on people with disability for the second year of implementation of the Plan.

The Wyndham Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2021-2025 (Health Plan) identifies people with a long-term health condition or disability as one of several priority groups requiring attention to address health inequities.  Accessibility and inclusion priorities are incorporated across all four domains of the Health Plan.  Disability access and inclusion is a whole of Council responsibility and aligns with the Healthy Cities Portfolio. 

 

 

Attachments

Nil

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Director City Life - Allison Kenwood

In providing this advice as the Director, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Manager Service Planning, Partnering and Reform - Georgie Hill

In providing this advice as the Manager, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

A/Coordinator Social & Service Planning - Lucy Midolo

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

Key Issues

·        The second year of implementation of Council’s Accessibility Action Plan progressed with slight impacts on scheduled actions due to the restrictions in response to COVID-19 and shifting priorities brought on during the pandemic. 

·        Council responses to support community during the pandemic, and the recovery planning has demonstrated inclusion for all community members.

·        Along with the challenges brought on by the pandemic, there have been some positive experiences expressed by some people with disability, such as the increased usage of inclusive technologies.

·        A new Accessibility Action Plan will be developed in 2022, building upon the success of the current plan, and will be guided by the new Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021-2031 and the new Disability State Plan for Victoria.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council note the Year 2 progress report of the Wyndham Accessibility Action Plan 2019-2022.

 

 

MOTION

 

CRS Adele Hegedich / Josh Gilligan

 

That Council note the Year 2 progress report of the Wyndham Accessibility Action Plan 2019-2022.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

The Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers undertaken by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2015 reported that around 12.6% of Wyndham’s population were estimated to have a disability.  The survey also estimated that 9.5% of the total Wyndham population were carers at that time.

Wyndham’s Accessibility Action Plan articulates the responsibilities and opportunities for Council to improve community access and inclusion of people living with disability.  Council with its many roles and broad reach is uniquely placed to support the improved health, wellbeing and safety of the Wyndham community.  The Plan was structured around the themes of the Wyndham City Plan 2017-2021 and addresses the four key areas mandated in the Victorian Disability Act 2006 of:

·    Reducing barriers to persons with disability accessing goods, services and facilities

·    Reducing barriers to persons with disability obtaining and maintaining employment

·    Promoting inclusion and participation in the community of persons with disability

·    Achieving tangible changes in attitudes and practices which discriminate against persons with disability. 

2.      Relevant Law

The Victorian Disability Act 2006 (Section 38) outlines the legal requirement for Councils, and other public sector bodies, to prepare a Disability Action Plan, or ensure that the required elements are included in their Council Plan.

In addition to the Victorian Disability Act, the other key disability and rights legislation that Council must comply with include:

·    Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1993

·    Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities 2006

·    Victorian Equal Opportunity Act 2010

·    Victorian Local Government Act 2020

3.      Discussion

This report provides a snapshot of some key actions that have progressed over the past twelve months to reduce barriers for people with disability and improve inclusion across the community.  It is worth noting that some actions scheduled for Year 2 were delayed due to the impacts of COVID-19 on operations and priority of resources. 

Alongside the second year of the Plan implementation, the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has continued to evolve.  The NDIS has been a much-needed significant social reform.  Approximately 10% of people living with disability in Australia will become NDIS participants with individual funded plans.  The evolution of the scheme since introduction has resulted in and increase and diversity of service options for participants.  Many participants are exercising more informed choice and control with their funded participant plans, with experience gained from earlier plans.  Some disability service organisations providing supports in the municipality have expanded their service offerings and/or reach to participants and some have specialised their services based on their strengths and understanding of the NDIS market. 

The Wyndham Disability Support Network has continued to grow with now hundreds of members.  The Network has provided a critical connection between service providers in Wyndham throughout the pandemic, sharing of service adaptations, gaps, community of practice discussions, and promotion of activities,community supports and pathways for individuals needing additional or different supports.  The Network has been key to providing Council with insights into the varied experiences of people with disability across the Wyndham community through this time. This included an informative roundtable hosted by Council’s CEO in 2020 focused on the disability sector.

Key issues arising for people with disability due to the pandemic

Community engagement has provided information on key concerns for people living with disability that arose through the pandemic.  Some of the concerns and challenges over the past eighteen months due to the pandemic have been:

·    Slow vaccine roll-out for people with disability, including accessible information to make informed decisions.  This includes the provision of accessible and appropriate vaccination settings and processes, and accessible information at an individual level

·    Hesitancy to seek health services or other services, including community access when restrictions allowed it.  Concerns for people who could fall through the gaps when disengaging from services or delaying health supports.

·    Wellbeing concerns, including mental health, with increased stressors due to the pandemic, and carer stress

·    Overwhelming amounts and sometimes inaccessible information about the pandemic

·    Concerns of family violence and during lockdowns.

·    Disengagement from community and social connections due to fear of in person interactions or limitations on capacity to transition to virtual activities

·    Disengagement from education and supports for those who were unable to continue their learning in a virtual environment

·    The digital divide meant that dedicated time and resources were required to build the capacity and access to technologies to stay connected or to access services virtually for those who had not previously had the capacity, equipment or confidence to use technologies

·    Underutilisation of NDIS funded plans.  This is due to some supports not being available due to restrictions, and some supports being cancelled by participants due to fears of exposure to COVID

·    The workforce shortage issues of the NDIS increased during the pandemic, with some workers not wanting to work with concerns about their own health

·    Concerns about business closures due to revenue impacts from decreased service access, at a relatively early period of NDIS market establishment

There have been anecdotal reports from people with disability during the impacts of the pandemic that have highlighted some positive experiences.  These include increased usage of inclusive technology platforms, and virtual services becoming mainstream.  This has been valued by some who faced access barriers in attending activities and services in person.  The isolation and limited community access that the whole community has experienced may evoke a deeper understanding and more empathy for some residents in our community who spend much of their time under similar circumstances for reasons other than public health order restrictions, such as barriers to community access or health reasons.

National Disability Insurance Scheme

There are workforce shortages leading to thin markets for some supports available for participants of the NDIS.  Specific shortages in Wyndham are related to allied health fields and access to early intervention services.  The lack of available early intervention supports has been a significant issue in the municipality over the past twelve months and will have enduring impacts for individuals and families.  The NDIS National Workforce Plan:2021-2025 was developed to address the expanding workforce demands.

Accessibility Action Plan Year 2 implementation highlights

AAP Aims

Year 2 Progress

Council’s website and materials are accessible for people with disability.

·    Website accessibility audit undertaken, and accessibility improvements made.

Volunteers are valued in Wyndham

·    Training sessions were offered to community members on ‘Disability Confidence’.

·    Completed the final four standards of The National Standards for Volunteer Involvement, which have a strong focus on inclusion and accessibility.

Council facilities and open spaces are accessible

·    The implementation of the Wyndham Coastal and Marine Management Plan includes a range of accessibility projects.  This includes exploring design and facility requirements to make Werribee South an accessible beach and playground.

Council is working with stakeholders to improve access and inclusion of people with disability in community activities.

·    An All Abilities Multi Sport Day was planned at Eagle Stadium in 2021, and unfortunately had to be postponed twice due to restrictions. 

·    Council Community Strengthening Grant supported the installation of new wayfinding beacon technology (BindiMaps) at Pacific Werribee.  This technology will enable people with low vision or blindness to navigate complicated indoor spaces independently and with confidence.

Council has a robust workplace adjustment policy and procedure.

·    A Workplace Adjustment policy and toolkit has been developed and is being implemented.

Recruitment processes are equitable for people with disability.

·    Council partnered with the Municipal Association of Victoria and several other Councils to pilot a work experience models for people with disability.   Wyndham was the only Council to successfully complete the program due to the impact of COVID restrictions.

Council will advocate for improved service provision and accessibility and inclusion across the City.

·    In response to the pandemic, Council successfully secured funding to boost psychosocial support through the introduction of the Community Connector service, Check in and Chat, Community Kitchen and bi-cultural workers. A dedicated Connected Communities Grant was made available for local organisations to transition social support, workshops and other various classes online to support those most at risk of loneliness and social isolation.

·    Through the H3 Alliance Council was successful in advocating for continued funding of $2Million over 2 years for the work of the H3 Alliance in addressing housing vulnerability in Wyndham. This funding has secured additional places for young people seeking refuge and long-term accommodation in Wyndham.

Wyndham City supports the rollout of the NDIS and its community members with disability and monitors the impact for the community.

·    Home and Community Care for Young People services continue to be provided by Council under agreement with the Victorian Government, with renewed flexibility to make operational improvements for eligible residents who do not access the NDIS. The new Community Connector roles also provide wrap around support for individuals, including those experiencing disability, to provide access to information and connect people to relevant activities and service supports.

·    Council has collaborated and contributed to consultations and discussions regarding the National Disability Strategy, the State Disability Plan, and the alignment to Local Government Access and Inclusion (Disability) Action Plans in the changed environment since the introduction of the NDIS.

·    Council continues to convene the Wyndham Disability Support Network with meetings held every second month.  Council also hosts a platform for network members to enable connections for service providers; linkages for individual outcomes; promotion of community activities; and community of practice discussions.

Wyndham supports the rollout of the school readiness funding and monitors the impact for children and their families.

·    Council has worked collaboratively with the State Government and early years partners to support the effective implementation of the School Readiness Funding program in Wyndham. This program enables the provision of targeted and timely early intervention supports for children enrolled in a State funded Kindergarten program.

The importance of maintaining mental wellbeing came to prominence during the pandemic and will continue to be a priority as our communities reopen and we move into the next phase of social and economic recovery.  Mental wellbeing was not an explicit aim of the Accessibility Action Plan as it has emerged as a key need since the adoption of the plan.  It is important to note that the absence of mental wellbeing, or presence of a mental illness, is not necessarily a disability.  The shift has seen Council responding to this community need through consultation with stakeholders and embedding this priority into the Health Plan. It is likely to emerge as a theme during consultation for Council’s next Accessibility Action Plan.

4.      City Plan

1.2.5  Council will celebrate the cultural diversity of our City, actively support social inclusion and tackle inequalities by ensuring all residents have access to services and building social connections in our local communities.

5.      Council Plan and Policies

The Wyndham City Accessibility Action Plan 2019-2022 articulates Council’s commitment to increase the access, inclusion and equitable participation of people with disability within Council and the community.

6.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

The National Disability Strategy, with the new title of Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021-2031 is ready for endorsement by all governments.  The consultations for the new Strategy were postponed in 2020 at the beginning of the impacts of the pandemic and were completed in 2021.  The new Strategy will be released later in 2021 once formally endorsed by all governments.  Similarly, the State Disability Plan is currently under development, with consultation on the new plan now closed.

The release of the new National and the State Plans will provide a framework for Council to leverage the commitments of other tiers of Government to improve outcomes for people with disability through the development of Council’s next Accessibility Action Plan.  These documents will guide how Council can align future actions and outcomes in measurable ways across all levels of government for collective impact.  The development of Council’s next Accessibility Action Plan will commence in 2022.  The consultation for the next plan will draw upon the progress of the current plan and key themes identified by the community during the consultations for the current Council Plan and Health Plan.

7.      Financial Viability

Not applicable.

8.      Sustainability Implications

Not applicable.

9.      Options

Not applicable.

10.    Community Engagement

Formal engagement monitoring the implementation of the Plan changed during the second year of implementation, with a new focus to engage with communities to understand emerging service gaps and community needs due to the impacts of the pandemic.  Community engagement was ongoing between Council and community service organisations and the Wyndham Disability Support Network.  Engagement through direct contact with residents or family to Council and with those directly accessing supports from Council also continued to contribute to the understand of community priorities.  Council hosted a series of Roundtables across a range of sectors in November 2020 to inform the development of the Wyndham Recovery Plan, including one for disability support organisations.  Council was able to respond with innovative partnerships, services and frequent information updates across the community, including people with disability. 

11.    Communication Strategy

Not applicable.

12.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Not applicable.

13.    Collaboration

Not applicable.

 

 

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.6

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

 

 

 

Proposal for new lease - Werribee Football Club - Non-retail lease inclusion of Athlete's Performance Hub

 

Summary

Council has received a request from the Werribee Football Club (WFC) to amend the Permitted Use of their existing lease to incorporate an Athlete Wellbeing and Performance Hub (Athlete’s Hub) at the Chirnside Park Pavilion. Chirnside Park is on Crown Land with Council being Committee of Management. The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) have no objection to the proposal, however, have advised that the amendment to the current Permitted Use triggers the requirement for a new lease to be entered into with the Club.

Pursuant to section 115(4) of the Local Government Act 2020 and consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy, a Notice of Intention to Lease was advertised on the Wyndham City Council website on 21 October 2021 outlining the proposal, allowing 28 days for feedback. The feedback period closed at 5:00pm on 18 November 2021, with no submissions being received.

 

 

Attachments

Nil

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Chief Executive Officer – Stephen Wall

In providing this advice as the Chief Executive Officer, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Chief Financial Officer - Binda Gokhale

In providing this advice as the Chief Financial Officer, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Strategic Property Management - Michael Hutchison

In providing this advice as the Coordinator, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Key Issues

·    Chirnside Park is on Crown Land, with Council nominated as Committee of Management.

·    Community engagement of Council’s intention to lease to WFC has been completed and no submissions were received.

·    Council is now in a position to formally consider entering into the proposed lease with WFC.

·    Entering into the new lease would allow WFC to further activate the Chirnside Park Pavilion consistent with Council’s Sports Facility User Guide.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council, having complied with section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act):

1.       Grants to Werribee Football Club Limited (WFC) a new lease for part of Chirnside Park Pavilion, legally described within Crown Allotment 3, Section 5A, Township of Werribee, Parish of Deutgam known as Chirnside Park (Crown Reserve) located at 220 Watton Street, Werribee with a revised Permitted Use for a term of twenty one (21) years with rental as follows:

a.   Base rent $4,646 per annum (plus GST) for Pavilion area with fixed annual rental increases at 5%; and

b.   Additional rent for the Athlete’s Hub based on usage, at $7.08 per hour (plus GST); and

2.       Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to execute the lease with WFC and any associated documents at the appropriate time.

 

Cr Mia Shaw, having declared a conflict of interest in this item, left the Chamber at 8.03pm, and was absent for the discussion and vote on item 6.5.5.

 

MOTION

 

CRS Jennie Barrera / Heather Marcus,

 

That Council, having complied with section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act):

1.       Grants to Werribee Football Club Limited (WFC) a new lease for part of Chirnside Park Pavilion, legally described within Crown Allotment 3, Section 5A, Township of Werribee, Parish of Deutgam known as Chirnside Park (Crown Reserve) located at 220 Watton Street, Werribee with a revised Permitted Use for a term of twenty one (21) years with rental as follows:

a.   Base rent $4,646 per annum (plus GST) for Pavilion area with fixed annual rental increases at 5%; and

b.   Additional rent for the Athlete’s Hub based on usage, at $7.08 per hour (plus GST); and

2.       Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to execute the lease with WFC and any associated documents at the appropriate time.

 

(CARRIED)

 

Cr Mia Shaw returned to the Chamber at 8.07pm.

1.      Background

Since the completion of the Chirnside Park Pavilion in 2018, Council’s Sport and Recreation department and WFC have had numerous discussions regarding how they may best be able to utilise the leased area to provide further value to both WFC and the community.

At the Ordinary Council Meeting on 5 February 2019, Council resolved to grant WFC two leases for parts of Chirnside Park as follows:

(a) Pavilion area lease for a term of 21 years at a commencing rent of $4,646.00 per annum plus GST with annual increases of 5% on each anniversary of the commencement date.

(b) Function area lease for a term of term of nine (9) years with the option to terminate at years 3 and 6 with a commencing rent of $14,251.40 per annum plus GST with annual increases of 5% on each anniversary of the commencement date.

The Athlete’s Hub proposal relates to the Pavilion area lease.

2.      Relevant Law

Pursuant to section 115(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act), a Council's power to lease any land to any person is limited to leases for a term of 50 years or less.

 

Pursuant to section 115 (4) of the Act, Council undertook a community engagement process in accordance with this section of the Act and consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy.

3.      Discussion

WFC approached Council Officers in April 2021 with a proposal to deliver an Athlete’s Hub to operate from the Gymnasium and Medical rooms within the Chirnside Park Pavilion. In summary, the Athlete’s Hub would work like an allied health clinic where people engage with a clinician for a one on one or small group appointment. Initial services offerings include strength and conditioning; sports injury rehabilitation; nutrition; massage; and physiotherapy. The Athlete’s Hub would utilise WFC branding.

 

It is recommended that Council support the proposal, which offers benefits to both parties as well as the broader community.

 

Benefits for WFC

·    Establishment of an additional and diverse revenue stream for WFC. Council has in the past urged WFC to pursue alternative revenue streams to reduce their reliance on, and ultimately withdraw from their involvement in poker machines. Support for this proposal is consistent with such messaging.

·    Increased capacity for WFC to attract and retain high performance staff. In addition to engaging a physiotherapist, strength and conditioning coach or nutritionist to work with the teams that WFC fields in the VFL competition, WFC will be able to offer an additional opportunity to work in the Athlete’s Hub. This more holistic offering is expected to support WFC to attract more qualified and experienced staff and for those staff to have a stronger level of commitment to WFC, Chirnside Park and Werribee.

 

 

 

Benefits for Community

·    Improves access for Wyndham residents to health, wellness and fitness opportunities. Establishment of the Athlete’s Hub will offer additional choice to residents living and working around the Werribee CBD to access services locally.

·    Subject to community demand the Athlete’s Hub may lead to further employment opportunities in the local Health, Wellness and Fitness industry.

Benefits for Council

·    Increased utilisation of Chirnside Park Pavilion. Council invested a significant amount of funds into the pavilion, with one of the key objectives being to maximise its activation. This proposal creates an opportunity to activate the facility in a new way, particularly during the day which is typically considered off peak with lower occupancy.

·    Building the capacity of health, wellness and fitness services at Chirnside Park Pavilion will make the facility more attractive to local and/or state athlete pathway programs (across any sport) in the future. Attracting state pathway programs to Wyndham may also deliver an economic benefit beyond Chirnside Park. For example, if Triathlon Victoria were to bring 100+ junior triathletes to Wyndham for a training weekend.

·    The Athlete’s Hub will attract people to Chirnside Park that wouldn’t have otherwise visited. To date, most visitors to Chirnside Park Pavilion would have been engaged in either football or cricket activities. The proposal offers to broaden the cross section of the community that engages with the facility in a similar way to the function or community programs that are also delivered from the facility.

Crown land lease

Chirnside Park is on Crown Land, with Council nominated as Committee of Management. Preliminary discussions have been held with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) regarding the WFC proposal. DELWP have advised that as the primary Permitted Use in the current lease will significantly alter, a Deed of Variation will not be permissible. DELWP will require a new lease for a term to be entered into on the same terms and conditions, save for:

·    A new Commencement Date;

·    Revised Permitted Use; and

·    Revised rental.

DELWP can provide Governor-in-Council approval following formal Council approval.

 

Council’s Sports Facility User Guide

Council’s Sports Facility User Guide (the overarching policy to guide facility occupancy and conditions of use) was reviewed and adopted in 2020. An addition was included during this review, to allow primary tenants the ability to sub-let to small businesses that have a primary purpose of delivering physical activity opportunities for the community.

 

Whilst some of the services provided by the Athlete’s Hub such as nutrition will fall outside of the principles of the Guide, there are several elements such as rehabilitation/strength training that would complement this remit.

 

 

 

Relevant Law

Section 115(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) provides Council power to lease land.

 

Pursuant to section 115(4) of the Act, Council is required to undertake a community engagement process in accordance with the Act and consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy.

 

If Council resolves to grant the lease, DELWP will then progress Crown approval.

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

·    Earning and Learning:
Our city will offer varied and plentiful local employment options. It will be a place of choice for businesses of all sizes and have a thriving network of small business operators.

5.      Council Plan

8.7 Ensure risks and legal processes are identified and managed effectively to achieve organisational priorities and strategic objectives

6.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

Not Applicable

7.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Not Applicable

8.      Financial Viability

Lease fees will be charged in line with the previously benchmarked figures for the Chirnside Park Pavilion, that informed the fee schedule for the existing commercial leased area within the pavilion (i.e. the 'Chirnside by the River' function space).


 

 

Table 1: Proposed lease financial overview

Lease 1 – Pavilion area

Permitted Use

Administration and operations of a sports club, including office, business administration, club player training (gymnasium and other), use of facilities for competition matches and team meetings.

Ancillary food and beverage preparation and sales in kiosk.

Non-sports club activities are permitted if delivering a health, wellness or fitness outcome to the community, subject to Council Officer approval.

Term

21 years

Commencing rent

Base rent $4,646 per annum (plus GST) for Pavilion area.

Additional rent for Athlete’s Hub based on usage, at $7.08 per hour (plus GST).

Rent increases

5% per annum

Outgoings

Outgoings and other charges payable by the tenant.

 

The updated permitted use within this lease will see the area used for commercial activities associated with the Athlete’s Hub outside of the times required for football (non-profit) community activities. The rent will comprise of the community use (Pavilion area) associated with the football club operations at $4,646 per annum (plus GST); and the commercial use (Athlete’s Hub) at $7.08 an hour (plus GST).

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Figure 1: Proposed Athlete’s Hub within the Pavilion area

9.      Sustainability Implications

Not Applicable 

10.    Options

Option 1: Support proposal - Recommended

Supporting the option will enable:

·     WFC to broaden its operations for the community and continue to attract and retain quality professional staff; and

·     Provide a financial benefit to both WFC and Council.

Option 2: Refuse proposal – Not recommended

Refusing the proposal will:

·    Limit WFC operations in providing additional health and wellbeing benefits for the community;

·    Limit the opportunity of WFC to generate additional revenue; and

·    Increase the risk of high turnover of qualified staff.

11.    Community Engagement

Pursuant to section 115(4) of the Local Government Act 2020 and consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy, a Notice of Intention to Lease was advertised on the Wyndham City Council website on 21 October 2021, outlining the proposals, allowing 28 days for feedback. The feedback period closed at 5:00pm on 18 November 2021. No submissions were received.

No further community engagement is required.

12.    Communication Strategy

Not Applicable.

13.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Not Applicable.

14.    Collaboration

Not Applicable.

 

 

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.7

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

 

 

 

Proposal to lease four (4) Council owned sites to early years partners for the delivery of kindergarten services

 

Summary

This report seeks Council’s decision on the granting of leases to:

·    KU Childrens Servies (KU) for 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit (Dianella Community Centre);

·    Early Childhood Management Services Inc (ECMS) for 117 Alcock Road, Truganina (Truganina South East Integrated Family Centre);

·    One Tree Community Services (One Tree) for 37 Ballan Road, Werribee (Werribee West Family Centre); and

·    Sparkways Early Learning (Sparkways) for 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook (Middleton Drive Kindergarten).

The leases are for the provision of integrated early childhood education and care services.

 

 

Attachments

Nil

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Chief Executive Officer – Stephen Wall

In providing this advice as the Chief Executive Officer, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Chief Financial Officer - Binda Gokhale

In providing this advice as the Chief Financial Officer, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Coordinator Strategic Property Management - Michael Hutchison

In providing this advice as the Coordinator, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Key Issues

·    Community engagement of intention to lease has been completed and no submissions were received.

·    Council is now in a position to formally consider entering into leases with KU, ECMS, One Tree and Sparkways.

·    Entering into lease agreements would allow KU, ECMS, One Tree and Sparkways to occupy the sites with a proposed lease commencement date of 1 December 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council, having complied with section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) grant leases to:

1.   KU Children’s Services for part of Dianella Community Centre legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12239 Folio 410 Lot RES1 on PS 838461 at 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit for the term of five (5) years, with one (1) further term option of five (5) years at a rate consistent with the Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

2.   Early Childhood Management Services Inc for Truganina South East Integrated Family Centre (IFC) described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12219 Folio 213 Lot RES1 on PS 810988 at 117 Alcock Road, Truganina for the term of five (5) years, with one (1) further term option of five (5) years at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

3.   One Tree Community Services Inc for Werribee West Family Centre legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 8363 Folio 761 Lot 1 on TP 243447 at 37 Ballan Road, Werribee for the term of five (5) years, with no further term options at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

4.   Sparkways Early Learning for Middleton Drive Kindergarten within Certificate of Title, Volume 11277 Folio 530 on PC 372233 at 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook for the term of five (5) years, with no further term options at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model; and

5.   Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to execute the leases and associated documents at the appropriate time.

 

Cr Robert Szatkowski left the Chamber at 8.08pm, and was absent for the vote on item 6.5.7.

MOTION

 

Cr Jasmine Hill / Sahana Ramesh

That Council, having complied with section 115 of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) grant leases to:

1.   KU Children’s Services for part of Dianella Community Centre legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12239 Folio 410 Lot RES1 on PS 838461 at 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit for the term of five (5) years, with one (1) further term option of five (5) years at a rate consistent with the Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

2.   Early Childhood Management Services Inc for Truganina South East Integrated Family Centre (IFC) described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12219 Folio 213 Lot RES1 on PS 810988 at 117 Alcock Road, Truganina for the term of five (5) years, with one (1) further term option of five (5) years at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

3.   One Tree Community Services Inc for Werribee West Family Centre legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 8363 Folio 761 Lot 1 on TP 243447 at 37 Ballan Road, Werribee for the term of five (5) years, with no further term options at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model;

4.   Sparkways Early Learning for Middleton Drive Kindergarten within Certificate of Title, Volume 11277 Folio 530 on PC 372233 at 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook for the term of five (5) years, with no further term options at a rate consistent with the proposed Early Years Partnership Framework and Costings Model; and

5.   Authorises the Chief Executive Officer to execute the leases and associated documents at the appropriate time.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

 Expressions of Interest were invited to Wyndham’s Early Years Partners on 22 July 2021 and closed on 11 August 2021 for the allocation of four Early Years sites. Council Officers have now notified the selected Early Years Partners of their site allocation and wish to proceed to provide draft service level agreements and leases for review and negotiation. 

2.      Relevant Law

Section 115(1) of the Local Government Act 2020 (the Act), provides Council power to lease land for a term of 50 years or less.

Pursuant to section 115(4) of the Act, Council is required to undertake a community engagement process in accordance with the Act and consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy.

3.      Discussion

A.   Dianella Community Centre: 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit

Legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12239 Folio 410 Lot RES1 on PS 838461. The land comprises a parcel of 7,999m2 and a proposed lease area of 1,457m2.

The Dianella Community Centre opened in early 2021. This sustainable, purpose-built facility has a wide range of community services for all ages and KU Early Years Partner is proposed to commence kindergarten operations in 2022 with 99 licensed spaces, sharing the space with Council.

Figure 1 - Aerial image showing Dianella Community Centre: 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit

B.   Truganina South East Integrated Family Centre (IFC): 117 Alcock Road, Truganina

Legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 12219 Folio 213 Lot RES1 on PS 810988. The land comprises a parcel of 5,995m2 and a proposed lease area of 5,995m2.

This new integrated children's centre will provide the Truganina community a high-quality learning environment, with Early Year Partner, ECMS proposed to lease the whole site to deliver kindergarten services for three and four-year-olds with 99 licensed spaces. This new centre will be located next to the Garrang Wilam Primary School.

Map

Description automatically generated

 

Figure 2 - Image showing Truganina South East: 117 Alcock Road, Truganina


 

 

C.  Werribee West Family Centre: 37 Ballan Road, Werribee

Legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 8363 Folio 761 Lot 1 on TP 243447. The land comprises a parcel of approximately 3,010m2 and proposed lease area of 3,010m2.

This existing site is proposed to be wholly leased to Early Years Partner, One Tree Community Services for the delivery of kindergarten services with 99 licensed spaces commencing operation in January 2022.

 

Map

Description automatically generated

 

Figure 3 - Aerial image showing Werribee West Family Centre: 37 Ballan Road, Werribee


 

 

D.  Middleton Drive Kindergarten: 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook

Legally described within Certificate of Title, Volume 11277 Folio 530 on PC 372233. The land comprises a parcel of approximately 3,639m2 and proposed lease area of 3,639m2.

This new Department of Education (DET) funded modular kindergarten on Council’s Reserve, will offer 2 rooms in stage 1 of development and a third room in stage 2 and is set to open in Point Cook early 2022. Council hold a head lease for the building from DET, with Early Years Partner Sparkways proposed to sub-lease from Council with 99 licensed spaces. This is a standalone kindergarten with no Council services on site.

 

A picture containing diagram

Description automatically generated

 

Figure 4 - Image showing Middleton Drive Kindergarten: 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook

 


 

A summary of the proposed leases are presented in Table 1.

 

Table 1: Proposed Lease Terms

 

Site/Location

 

Partner

Proposed Lease Commencement Date

Proposed Lease Term

Dianella Community Centre:

6 Congo Drive, Tarneit

(Volume 12239 Folio 410)

KU

1 December 2021

5 years with further 5 years option

Truganina South East IFC:

117 Alcock Road, Truganina

(Volume 12219 Folio 213)

ECMS

1 December 2021

5 years with further 5 years option

Werribee West Family:

37 Ballan Road, Werribee Centre

(Volume 8363 Folio 761)

One Tree

1 December 2021

5 years, no further option (interim measure to ascertain demand for kindergarten services in the area)

Middleton Drive Kindergarten:

1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook

(Volume 11277 Folio 530)

Sparkways

1 December 2021

5 years only, no further option (temporary kindergarten – demountable - due to shortage of kindergarten services in Point Cook)

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

Aligns with the following Wyndham 2040 key community priorities:

·    People and Community:
Providing education opportunities for all ages.

·    Places and Spaces:
Offering better access to local services and facilities.

·    Earning and Learning:
Support Wyndham’s young people to develop leadership and life skills.

There will be many ways for people to learn and gain employment.

5.      Council Plan

1.1 Provide high quality, equitable and accessible services and community facilities that cater for all ages and life stages.

6.      Financial Viability

The proposed leases will be in line with the Early Years Partner Costing Framework to provide consistency across all Early Years Partners.

 

Lease arrangements with Early Years Partners will reflect subsidised maintenance costs, to recognise their delivery of prioritised community services. Subsidisation of costs may be negotiated according to:

·    the Provider’s capacity to pay, particularly where there is a requirement for Wyndham City to fulfil an acute, unmet need, eg. a small not-for-profit provider is best placed to meet specific community needs;

·    establishment period for new sites;

·    site size (which may impact on whether the Provider can create a viable business, particularly single standing unit kindergartens);

·    other circumstances that may warrant fully subsidised arrangements.

The level of subsidy on operation and maintenance costs will be negotiated with Partners on an individual case basis. Total fees will vary in accordance with the physical service footprint and/or quantity of floor space occupied. For new sites, a graduated rate for the Partnership Contribution may be considered over the first three years as Partners establish attendance rates. For example, the Partnership Fund contribution of $20,000 may be reduced in the first year until the Partners establish financial viability at the new sites (Werribee West and Middleton Drive) through increased enrolment numbers and additional program offerings.

 

The Early Years Partners will be subject to an annual fee for each leased facility to cover:

 

·    Operation, cleaning and maintenance costs;

·    Waste management;

·    Inclusion in Wyndham City’s Central Registration Service;

·    Contribution to a Partnership Fund. Council seeks a Partnership contribution of $20,000 per annum, per site from Partners. The Partnership contribution will be used by Council to facilitate:

Implementing and embedding the Partnership Framework

Community programs and infrastructure

Professional development, aligned with Council priorities

Advocacy, campaigns and government reform agendas

Approved infrastructure upgrades and minor capital works (limited to $10,000 per site); eg. Office alterations, renovations and refurbishments, replacement and renewal of playground equipment

Evaluation activities and processes

Lease fees will be reviewed annually and the amount payable may be increased by the Consumer Price Index (CPI) each year, calculated at the June Quarter. Should CPI be negative then Lease fees will be as per prior year. The revenue has been considered for the 2021/22 budget. Indicative lease cost is provided in the tables below.


 

 

Table 2: Indicative Lease fees - KU - Dianella Community Centre, 6 Congo Drive, Tarneit

 

Indicative Fee Structure

Annual Cost ($)

Operating & Maintenance Costs (based on leased area)

4,880.95

Waste Management

Assumes 6 x garbage + 6 x recycling bins + 1 green waste bin

1,776.00

Central Registration: 99 children (will vary depending on each year’s enrolments)

4,984.65

Partnership Fund

20,000.00

Total (Excl GST)

31,641.60

 

Table 3: Indicative Lease fees - ECMS - Truganina South East ILC: 117 Alcock Road, Truganina

 

Indicative Fee Structure

Annual Cost ($)

Operating & Maintenance Costs (based on leased area)

18,743.25

Waste Management

Assumes 6 x garbage + 6 x recycling bins + 1 green waste bin

1,776.00

Central Registration: 99 children

4,984.65

Partnership Fund (may be negotiated for the first year of operations)

20,000.00

Total (Excl GST)

45,503.90

 

Table 4: Indicative Lease fees - One Tree - Werribee West Family: 37 Ballan Road, Werribee Centre

 

Indicative Fee Structure

Annual Cost ($)

Operating & Maintenance Costs (based on leased area)

10,083.50

Waste Management

Assumes 6 x garbage + 6 x recycling bins + 1 green waste bin

1,776.00

Central Registration: 66 children

3,323.10

Partnership Fund (may be negotiated for the first year of operations)

20,000.00

Total (Excl GST)

35,182.60

 


 

Table 5: Indicative Lease fees – Sparkways - Middleton Drive Kindergarten: 1-5 Saltwater Promenade, Point Cook

 

Indicative Fee Structure

Annual Cost ($)

Operating & Maintenance Costs (based on leased area)

12,192.46

Waste Management

Assumes 6 x garbage + 6 x recycling bins + 1 green waste bin

1,776.00

Central Registration: 99 children

4,984.65

Partnership Fund (may be negotiated for the first year of operations)

20,000.00

Total (Excl GST)

38,953.11

 

7.      Sustainability Implications

The Early Years Centre’s will deliver economic and employment opportunities to Wyndham. This is largely through the creation of jobs and new visitations to the centres and the localised associated economic benefits this brings.

8.      Options

Option 1- Progress process to enter into leases: Recommended

Council officers will begin lease negotiations and enter into leases with Early Years Partners.

Option 2- Do not proceed with leases: Not Recommended

Council advise Early Years Partners they will not be proceeding to enter into leases. This would have a significant impact on the community with a potential shortfall of 330 kindergarten places. This is a conservative figure as currently Truganina South East alone has 110 children registered for 2022. Point Cook kindergartens are all full.  Middleton Drive was expedited by DET due a very large shortfall of kindergarten places in Point Cook which came about as a result of the funding of 3 year old kindergarten.

9.      Community Engagement

A notice was placed on Council’s website for two weeks to advise the community of its intention to enter into leases with the Early Years Partners at the four sites consistent with Council’s Community Engagement Policy. No submissions where received.

10.    Communication Strategy

Not Applicable

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.8

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

 

 

 

Biannual Report of the Audit & Risk Committee

 

Summary

The Local Government Act 2020 (the Act) establishes functions to be undertaken by Council’s Audit and Risk Committee.

 

Section 8 items 54 (4) and (5) require an Audit and Risk Committee to:

·    undertake an annual assessment of its performance against the Audit and Risk Committee Charter; and

·    Chair of the ARC to prepare a biannual audit and risk report that describes the activities of the Audit and Risk Committee and includes its findings and recommendations.

The Act also requires the Chief Executive Officer to table these reports at a Council meeting.

This is the first biannual report to be presented for the 2021/22 Financial Year and incorporates the annual audit and risk performance review undertaken.

   

 

Attachments

1.

Annual Audit & Risk Committee Performance Review

2.

Biannual Audit & Risk Committee Audit and Risk Report

 

  

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Chief Executive Officer – Stephen Wall

In providing this advice as the Chief Executive Officer, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Audit and Risk Committee Chair – Kathy Alexander

In providing this report as the Chair, on behalf of the Audit and Risk Committee, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Key Issues

·        Tabling of the Biannual Audit and Risk Committee report to Council and Annual Performance Assessment of the Audit and Risk Committee.

 

RECOMMENDATION

That Council:

1.   Note the Annual Performance Assessment of the Audit and Risk Committee; and

2.   Note the Biannual Risk Report of the Audit and Risk Committee for the period Quarter 4 2020/21 – Quarter 1 2021/22.

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Susan McIntyre / Jasmine Hill

That Council:

1.   Note the Annual Performance Assessment of the Audit and Risk Committee; and

2.   Note the Biannual Risk Report of the Audit and Risk Committee for the period Quarter 4 2020/21 – Quarter 1 2021/22.

 

(CARRIED)

 

Cr Robert Szatkowski returned to the Chamber at 8.11pm, and was present for the vote on item 6.5.8.

1.      Background

Under the Local Government Act 2020, Section 8 (1), the role of a Council is to provide good governance in its municipal district for the benefit and wellbeing of the municipal community. It specifies in Sections 53 and 54, that Council must operate an Audit and Risk Committee whose charter is adopted by Council.

The Wyndham City Council Audit and Risk Committee Charter was adopted by Council at its July 2020 meeting. The Audit and Risk Charter is supported by the Annual Work Program, which is a working document and updated as required. It lists the proposed standing agenda and work plan which demonstrate how the Charter commitments will be met across the financial year.

2.      Relevant Law

The Local Government Act 2020, Section 54 (4), requires that an Audit and Risk Committee:

a)    Undertake an annual assessment of its performance against the Audit and Risk Committee Charter; and

b)    provide a copy of the annual assessment to the Chief Executive Officer for tabling at Council meeting.

The Local Government Act 2020, Section 54 (5), requires that an Audit and Risk Committee:

a)   prepare a Biannual Audit and Risk Report that describes the activities of the Audit and Risk Committee and includes its findings and recommendations; and

b)  provide a copy of the Biannual Audit and Risk Report to the Chief Executive Officer for tabling at Council meeting.

3.      Discussion

The Committee activities are aligned to their four primary objectives, as outlined in the Charter:

1)      Governance – ensuring the transparency of Committee performance in meeting the obligations of this Charter through planning a program of work, assessing and reporting on its achievements.

2)      Finance & Performance – enhancing the credibility and objectivity of Council’s financial and performance management and reporting, including review of accounting policy and practice.

3)      Audit & Assurance – obtaining confidence in the performance of management, through independent and objective assessment of the organisation.

4)      Risk & Compliance – reviewing the appropriateness and effectiveness of management’s risk and compliance systems and confirming that an adequate internal control environment is maintained.

The Annual Audit and Risk Committee Performance Review (Attachment 1) assures that the requirements of their Charter have been met. It is also used to identify any improvement opportunities which may trigger an update of the Charter or other changes to current Committee arrangements. The assessment is based on a survey, unchanged from last year, which covers 31 elements across nine areas aligned with Charter requirements. All areas were adequate with the overall weighted average score higher than the past three years. The attached report was presented at the September 2021 Audit and Risk Committee meeting. It concludes that the Committee have met their obligations as described in the Charter. Note that the tabling of this report was deferred from the October meeting to this meeting to enable it to presented together with the Biannual Audit and Risk report.

The Biannual Audit and Risk Report (Attachment 2) presents the activities as directed by the work program for the period, as well as listing additional activities included at the request of the Committee or as recommended by Management. The Chair comments on findings and recommendations of note on behalf of the Committee, who are consulted during development of the report.

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

The Audit and Risk Committee is an advisory committee that plays a key role to assist council to fulfil its assurance and compliance responsibilities. Monitoring its performance is an important part of assuring the effectiveness of the Committee in delivering on its mandate.

The Committee provides advice on broad aspects of the Council’s operations, focusing on finance and performance, audit and assurance, risk and compliance. Information presented for Committee consideration relates to achievement of the Wyndham 2040 Vision across all four themes - People and Community; Places and Spaces; Earning and Learning; Leadership and Participation.

5.      Council Plan

7.3 Foster trust in Council through the implementation of effective civic leadership and responsible governance processes that ensure accountability and compliance with all legislated and statutory requirements.

The Biannual Audit and Risk Report contributes to providing assurance to the broader community, that the governance structures Wyndham City is required to have in place to ensure it acts with integrity and ethically in performing its duties, are communicating transparently in their reporting to Council.

The Annual Audit and Risk Committee Performance Review contributes to providing assurance to the broader community that the governance structures Wyndham City is required to have in place to ensure it acts with integrity and ethically in performing its duties, is operating effectively.

6.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

The Audit and Risk Committee Charter is publicly available on the Wyndham City Council Website. Under the Charter, the ARC approves the Internal Audit Charter, Strategic Internal Audit Plan and Annual Internal Audit Plan. To enable the Committee to discharge its responsibilities, it has visibility of key organisational management policies and practices including Enterprise Risk, Business Continuity, Enterprise Compliance, Procurement, Fraud and Corruption Control, Public Interest Disclosure and Financial Management.

7.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Not applicable

8.      Financial Viability

The independent committee members are compensated for their participation on this Committee as provided for by Local Government Act 2020, Section 53 (6).

In the discharge of its duties, the Committee monitors the annual financial and performance reporting of Wyndham City Council and recommends in principle the adoption of Annual Financial and Performance Statements to Council.

9.      Sustainability Implications

The Committee reviews the strategic risk to Environmental Sustainability that WCC may not effectively achieve positive environmental and sustainability goals. The Committee reviews the diverse range of activity undertaken across the organisation to assure strategic objectives related to sustainability are achieved.

10.    Options

Not applicable

11.    Community Engagement

Not applicable

12.    Communication Strategy

This report informs Council and the community of matters reviewed by the Committee in the performance of its duties, highlighting noteworthy items. It provides assurance that the operational activities of management are being reviewed independently.

13.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

An annual assessment of Committee performance is undertaken to confirm that the responsibilities of the charter have been met and identify opportunities for improvement. It is provided to the CEO for tabling at the relevant Council meeting.

14.    Collaboration

The Committee has a key advisory role in assisting Council to fulfil its assurance and compliance responsibilities. It engages directly with management as well as obtaining independent advice and information from the internal and external auditors.  There is opportunity at each meeting for the Committee members only to meet, without Council

officers present, and with the Internal Auditor without management present.

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 1 - Annual Audit & Risk Committee Performance Review

 

Item No: 6.5.8

 

Briefing Paper

annual arc assessment FY2020-21

 

Audit & Risk Committee Meeting 15 September 2021

 

DIRECTORATE:

CFO Office

PRESENTER:

Chair

ACTION:

Noting

1.  Purpose

This report provides the results of the Annual Assessment undertaken regarding the effectiveness and performance of the Audit and Risk Committee (ARC) against its Charter.

 

The outcomes of the assessment are intended for presentation by the CEO to Council at the October 2021 Ordinary Council Meeting.

2.  Recommendation

That the Audit & Risk Committee (ARC)  note for Committee information, discussing as required.

3.  Background

The ARC Annual Self-Assessment Survey is designed to gather feedback to assess the effectiveness and performance of the Committee against its Charter responsibilities in FY2020-2021. The survey for this year did not change from the survey reported last year. Refer to Attachment 1 for a list of survey questions. It was adapted from the Local Government Victoria’s guide “Audit Committee-A Guide to Good Practice for Local Government”. Committee members, the CEO, CFO and members of the Executive Leadership Team who attended meetings during the year, were invited to participate.

The ARC Charter was revised during FY2019-2020, incorporating requirements of the Local Government Act 2020. This charter, was adopted by Council in July 2020 and came into effect in September 2020. It requires that the Committee undertake an annual assessment of its performance to confirm the responsibilities of this charter have been met and provide to the CEO for tabling at the next Council Meeting.

4.  Survey Results

The FY2020-2021 ARC Assessment Survey indicates an increased level of satisfaction with Committee performance in the execution of their responsibilities. The assessment covers 31 elements across nine areas which are aligned with the requirements of the charter. This conclusion is based on the comparison of the overall weighted average score:

Survey Statistics

FY2020-2021

FY2019-2020

FY2018-2019

FY2017-2018

FY2016-2017

Average Rating

5.1 / 6

4.75 / 6

4.1 / 6

4.20 / 6

4.25 / 6

LEGEND: Score 1-2 Less Than Adequate; Score 3-4 Adequate; Score 5-6 More than Adequate

 

 

 

4.1.    Assessment analysis

The weighted average of individual question scores has trended higher than last year across the board.

LEGEND: Score <2 Less Than Adequate; Score 2-4 Adequate; Score 5+ More than Adequate

All areas were scored 4 or above. There were limited comments provided, those received are summarised below.

1    Monitoring & Reporting Responsibilities More information on legislation / regulation compliance framework to be assured Internal audit presentation, coverage and quality review

2    Information Received to Discharge Charter Responsibilities No feedback received

3    Monitoring of Wyndham City’s Governance Arrangements ARM committee has knowledge about the governance process of executive but less knowledge of council itself. Eg training levels in audit and engagement of council in audit has not been high. This may change with the new council members and with the new legislative requirements; Internal audit function has been excellent and extensive. It has provided good guidance for improvement in a practice and realistic way.

4    Assurance & Controls See Above comments

5    Financial Controls & Reporting See Above comments

6    Compliance Management attestation process improvements have benefited staff compliance awareness

7    Auditor Performance internal audit function process and action reporting improved, positively impacting assurance

8    Meeting consider summarising agenda and timing of minutes circulation

9    Training review training required/provided to councillor members

10  Other Matters note question set coverage is comprehensive

5.  Charter Compliance

All requirements outlined in the charter have been met, except for the Biannual Risk Report. This was only produced once during the year, as the implementation was slightly delayed to accommodate the Council elections and subsequent change in Committee membership. An extract of the current charter is provided at Attachment 2 for reference purposes.

5.1.    Independent Member Tenure

Independent members are eligible to serve on the Committee for a maximum of two 3 year terms.

Independent member tenure summary

Kathy Alexander (Chair)

Second Term expiry 24 June 2024

Jeff Rigby

Second Term expiry 20 August 2023

John Watson

Second Term expiry 31 May 2022

Dr AJ (John) Purcell

Second Term resigned July 2020 due to other work commitments

Kylie Maher

First Term appointed March 2020, expiry 3 March 2024

 

5.2.    Biannual Committee Declarations

Receipt of biannual written declarations of Committee members by the CEO has been confirmed with the Governance team.

5.3.    Committee Reporting to Council

There are two reports mandated by the Local Government Act to be presented to Council by the CEO:

1.    Annual Assessment of Audit and Risk Committee Performance was tabled at the December 2020 meeting.

2.    The inaugural Biannual Risk Report was tabled at the March 2021 meeting.

6.  Charter Amendment

There have been no changes to the current Charter identified as required by the Committee. However, a number of minor corrections are proposed. The have been noted in red text in the extract provided at Attachment 2.  These changes are not material and will not require Council approval, as per the Charter.

§  The term ‘Wyndham City Council’ used to refer to the municipal council as an organisation, has been amended to ‘Wyndham City’, for consistency with current organisational standard.

§  To be consistent with the naming in the Local Government Act 2020, any reference to self-assessment is changed to assessment and reference to the Annual Workplan has changed to Work Program.

§  Clarification that Council not Wyndham City will appoint and terminate providers of internal audit services.

§  In response to COVID-19 and the shift to online meetings, the requirement for teleconference or videoconference facilities to be made available with the ‘prior approval of the Chair’, will be removed.

§  Change from ‘will’ to will have opportunity to’ in relation to the ability of the Committee to meet separately with the internal and external auditor, without management present, as they may choose not to exercise the opportunity.

§  The level of the honorarium has been clarified as being agreed by Council as part of the appointment process.

§  Change from ‘will’ to ‘may’ in relation to issue of internal audit scopes for quorum approval via circular resolution.

7.  Attachments

Attachment 1: Assessment Questions FY2020-2021
Attachment 2: Audit & Risk Committee Charter (Extract)

 Authorisation 

Catherine Burbidge, Risk Coordinator                                                                                      ……………………………………………………..				…………………………………………………………………
Name – Author 							e-Signature 

Binda Gokhale, Chief Financial Officer
……………………………………………………………				…………………………………………………………………
Name – Director 						e-Signature


1          Monitoring & Reporting Responsibilities

The Committee has monitored and reported on the systems and activities of Wyndham City in ensuring:

(a)  Reliable financial reporting and management information

(b)  High standards of corporate governance

(c)  Appropriate application of accounting policies

(d)  Compliance with applicable laws and regulations

(e)  Effective and efficient internal audit function

(f)   Effective and efficient external audit function

(g)  Measures to provide early warning of any issues affecting the organisation’s financial well-being

(h)  The level and effectiveness of appropriate Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning

(i)   Maintenance and fostering an ethical environment

2          Information Received to Discharge Charter Responsibilities

The Committee has received whatever information, presentations, or explanations it considers necessary to fulfil its responsibilities

3          Monitoring of Wyndham City’s Governance Arrangements

The Committee has worked with management and Internal Audit to develop a framework for monitoring the multi-dimensional elements of corporate governance

4          Assurance & Controls

The Committee has:

(a)  Gained a level of assurance that systems are in place within Wyndham City to identify high risks

(b)  Scheduled audit reviews in accordance with risk assessments

(c)  Reviewed the effectiveness of internal control systems in place

(d)  Made recommendations to address control deficiencies

5          Financial Controls & Reporting

The Committee has reviewed the effectiveness of management information including financial controls and reporting

6          Compliance Management

The Committee has reviewed reports outlining:

(a)  Developments and changes in key regulations and laws which have the potential to impact Wyndham City’s strategies and plans

(b)  Management’s assurances related to compliance with legislations and regulations

7          Performance of Auditors

The Committee has:

(a)  Reviewed the performance of internal audit

(b)  Met privately with the internal and external auditors

(c)  Recommended internal audit appointments to Council (if applicable)

(d)  Provided a structured reporting line for internal and external audit

(e)  Annually approved the Strategic (Three-Year) Internal Audit Plan and the Annual Internal Audit Plan

(f)   Reviewed progress in the implementation of the audit recommendations

8          Meetings

Committee Meetings:

(a)     Were regularly attended by the members

(b)     Were conducted in accordance with the agenda issued

(c)     Agendas and supporting papers have been well structured and well written

(d)     Have been conducted to allow for full participation by all members

(e)     Have allowed ARMC members to raise any issue they believe relevant

(f)      Have been conducted to allow for open, frank and robust discussion of all matters raised

9          Training

The Committee has received adequate training requirements to meet their obligations and responsibilities

10        Other Matters

Are there any other matters you believe should be raised as part of this assessment of the performance of the Committee for the FY2020/2021?


 

1.    Role

All Victorian councils are required to establish audit committees under the Victorian Local Government Act. While the Audit & Risk Committee (the Committee) is not a delegated committee of Council[1], under the act they are subject to the same obligations as a delegated committee in relation to integrity standards and penalties for their breach.

The Committee has no executive role. It is an advisory committee that plays a key role to assist Wyndham City Council[2] to fulfil its assurance and compliance responsibilities. It is independent of management and reports to the Council, providing recommendations to facilitate decision-making by the Council.  The Committee engages with management in a constructive and professional manner in discharging its advisory responsibilities and formulating its advice to Wyndham City Council.

The Committee has an important independent governance role for the organisation. Wyndham City Council utilises the ‘Three Lines of Defence’ governance model. This is recognised as global best practice in the governance of an organisations risk and control management systems. This model is used to structure the assurance environment and clarify roles and responsibilities.

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2.    Date of Effect

This charter has effect from 7 July 2020, following its adoption by Council at its Ordinary Meeting on this date.

3.    Review Frequency

The Charter will be reviewed annually by the Committee subsequent to its annual self-assessment and Council approval will be sought for any proposed material amendment.
Note that the Audit and Risk Committee Annual Workplan Program will be presented as part of Council approval process but is a working document and will be updated as required.

4.    Objective

The primary objectives of the Committee relate to:

§ Governance – ensuring the transparency of Committee performance in meeting the obligations of this Charter; through planning a program of work, assessing and reporting on its achievement.

§ Finance & Performance – enhancing the credibility and objectivity of financial and performance management and reporting, including review of accounting policy and practice.

§ Audit & Assurance obtaining confidence in the performance of management, through independent and objective assessment of the organisation (or a similar organisation).

§ Risk & Compliance – reviewing the appropriateness and effectiveness of management’s risk and compliance systems and confirming that an adequate internal control environment is maintained.

5.    Authority

The Committee is authorised to:

§ Review the internal and external auditor’s annual audit plans and reports of all audits undertaken.

§ Seek any information or advice it requires from Councillors, Management or external agencies via the Chief Executive Officer.

§ Formally meet with Councillors, management, internal and external auditors as necessary to fulfil its responsibilities.

§ Seek resolution on any disagreements between management and the external auditors on financial reporting.

§ Request external legal or other professional advice, as considered reasonably necessary to meet its responsibilities, that will be provided at Wyndham City Council’s expense.

§ Recommend to Wyndham City Council the appointment and termination of internal audit services.

The Chair is authorised to:

§ Require the tabling of Committee reports via the CEO to Council at Ordinary Council Meetings.

§ Prepare a biannual audit and risk report which describes the activities of the Committee, including finding and recommendations, on behalf of the members; which will be provided to the CEO for tabling at Council[3].

6.    Membership

The Committee will comprise seven members, the majority of whom must be independent:

§ one (1) independent Chair (must not be a Councillor of Wyndham City Council);

§ three (3) independent members with backgrounds in finance, risk management and have experience in public sector management; and

§ three (3) Councillors (including the Mayor).

The Committee must collectively have expertise in financial management and risk; and experience in public sector management.

The Committee must not include any person who is a member of Wyndham City Council staff.

Committee members must hold in strict confidence all information acquired through the Council. They must not intentionally or recklessly disclose information that the person knows, or should reasonably know, is confidential information; unless authorised by Wyndham City Council or for approved specified legal or regulatory purposes. They must not intentionally misuse their position to attempt or gain, directly or indirectly, an advantage for themselves or another; or to attempt or cause detriment to Wyndham City Council.

6.1       Independent Committee Members

Council will appoint the independent members, including the Chair.

The independent member appointments, including the Chair, are for one term of three years. They are eligible for re-appointment for a second and final three-year term. They will not be re-appointed beyond a second consecutive term. Reappointment should consider the avoidance of more than one member retiring at the same time. To enable orderly rotation of membership, a shorter-term reappointment may be considered, to remain within the six-year maximum term.

The independent members of the Committee will receive an honorarium for their attendance at meetings and the work undertaken between meetings. The level of the honorarium will be agreed by Council as part of the appointment process  reviewed annually by Wyndham City and paid quarterly.

The independent members will be covered by the Professional Indemnity insurance maintained by Wyndham City Council in relation to adverse outcomes arising from advice provided in good faith while acting in their role as Committee member.

6.2       Councillor Committee Members

The Mayor – ex officio, is appointed to the Committee annually.

Two additional Councillors, preferably with a background in finance and/or risk management or are open to participate in professional development to better equip them for the role.

Councillors will be appointed to the Committee by the Council for one term of four years. Their eligibility for continuous re-appointment is at the discretion of the Council.

Where a serving Councillor is elected as the Mayor, during their term as a member of the Committee, the subsequent vacancy may be filled at the discretion of Council.

7.    Quorum

The Committee quorum shall be three members, comprising two independent members and one councillor member.

8.    Meetings

8.1       Meeting Attendance

All Committee members and the CEO are expected to make every endeavour to attend each meeting in person. However, teleconference or videoconference facilities will be made available if required with the prior approval of the Chair.

In addition to the Committee Members, the following persons have a standing invitation to attend relevant sections of the Committee meetings:

§ Wyndham City Council Executive and Management as directed by the Chief Executive Officer;

§ Wyndham City Council internal auditors; and

§ Wyndham City Council secretariat support.

Other Council employees may be invited at the discretion of the Chair or a standing invitee.

Representatives of the external auditor will attend meetings relevant to the preparation and presentation of the annual financial report and results of the external audit. The external auditor may be invited to attend other meetings as required.

Standing invitees are expected to attend when an agenda item related to their portfolio is presented.

8.2       Meeting Conduct

The Committee will meet at least four times a year, with authority to convene additional meetings, as circumstances require.

The Chair of the Committee is authorised to appoint an Acting Chair when required.

The Committee may, if required, agree to conduct business by circular resolution with approval of the Chair.

Committee members must declare any conflicts of interest at the commencement of each meeting or before discussion of the relevant agenda item or topic.  Details of any conflicts of interest will be appropriately minuted.

Where members or invitees at Committee meetings are deemed to have a real, potential or perceived conflict of interest, it may be appropriate that they be excused from Committee deliberations on the issue pertaining to that conflict.

The Committee, without management present, will have opportunity to meet separately with the internal auditor and the external auditor, at least annually, to discuss issues of relevant interest.

8.3       Meeting Facilitation

The Chief Executive Officer must facilitate the meetings of the Committee, maintain appropriate records and provide secretariat support to the Committee, such that:

§  Meeting agendas together with appropriate briefing material are prepared and provided in advance of the meeting date to members, generally seven calendar days.

§  Internal audit scopes will may be issued for quorum approval via circular resolution.

§  Minutes are prepared and distributed for approval after the meeting and then ratified at the following meeting.

§  Receipt of biannual written declarations of Committee members by the CEO is confirmed. These declarations will state whether members have any pecuniary or other interests of a personal nature, that create a real or potential conflict of interest; that would preclude them from performing their duties as a member of the Committee.

9          Responsibilities

9.1       Governance

§  Receive an update from the CEO on significant achievements and strategic matters which increase Committee understanding of the organisational context and enable the effective performance of their role.

§  Undertake an annual self-assessment of Committee performance to confirm the responsibilities of this charter have been met and provide to the CEO for tabling at the next Ordinary Council Meeting.

§  Adopt a forward meeting schedule including a proposed plan for each meeting for the forthcoming year, that covers the responsibilities of this charter.

9.2       Finance and Performance

§  Monitor the annual financial and performance reporting of Wyndham City Council, and consider whether it is complete, consistent with information known to the Committee, and reflects appropriate accounting principles and policy.

§  Review significant accounting and reporting issues, including complex or unusual transactions and areas that rely substantially on professional judgment, and recent accounting, professional and regulatory pronouncements and legislative changes, and understand their effect on financial policy management and reporting.

§  Review the process for the consolidation of financial information of any Wyndham City Council related entities into the annual financial report.

§  Recommend the adoption of Annual Financial and Performance Statements to Council.

§  Monitor Councillor expenses, to ensure they are in line with policy and are an appropriate use of public funds.

§  Monitor Chief Executive Officer purchasing card expenses, to ensure they are in line with policy and are an appropriate use of public funds.  

9.3       Audit and Assurance

Monitor the performance audits undertaken by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office, and other relevant reports conducted by external integrity agencies, considering the implications for Wyndham City Council.

Provide an opportunity for the auditors to meet with the Committee to discuss any matters that the Committee, internal auditor or external auditor believes should be discussed privately.

Internal Audit

§  Review with management and the internal auditor the performance of the internal audit function, ensuring the charter, activities, staffing, and structure are appropriate to enable their independent review.

§  Review and approve the annual audit plan and all major changes to the plan, including coverage of material business risks.

§  Monitor the execution of the internal audit plan, by approving internal audit scopes, accepting internal audit reports and reviewing managements completion of agreed actions.

External audit[4]

§  Note the external auditor’s proposed audit scope and approach, including any reliance on internal auditor activity.

§  Review with management and the external auditor the results of the financial audit.

9.4       Risk and Compliance

Risk Management

§  Monitor and advise on the implementation of the risk framework and management of strategic risks, including consideration of the effectiveness of the key control environment and reliability of assurance activities.

§  Review insurance coverage and claims management annually to be assured of the adequacy of the insurance program as a key mitigation for financial risk exposure.

§  Monitor and advise on the implementation of the business continuity management system, obtaining sufficient assurance that management have an appropriate and effective system in place.

Compliance Management

§  Monitor and advise on the implementation of the enterprise compliance management system, and management of compliance obligations, including consideration of the effectiveness of the key control environment and reliability of assurance activities.

§  Receive and review management assurances and relevant supporting evidence in relation to the systems and processes in place to monitor the effectiveness of compliance with legislation and regulations.

§  Monitor and advise on the implementation of the fraud and corruption control management system, obtaining sufficient assurance that management have an appropriate and effective system in place.

§  Monitor application of integrity policies and the reporting of their associated registers: Gifts, Benefits & Hospitality Policy and Conflict of Interest – Compliance, Process & Guidance Policy.

 


 

ATTACHMENT No: 2 - Biannual Audit & Risk Committee Audit and Risk Report

 

Item No: 6.5.8

 

Biannual Audit and Risk Report – October 2021

Part 1: Activities of the Audit and Risk Committee

Committee meeting information and content for the 6 month period covering the June and September Audit and Risk Committee meetings.

ARC Meeting – 9 June 2021

Committee attendance: Dr Kathy Alexander (Chair); Cr Adele Hegedich (Mayor); Mr Jeff Rigby; Mr John Watson; Ms Kylie Maher; Cr Susan McIntyre; Cr Sahana Ramesh;

Management attendance: Mr Natalie Walker (CEO - Acting); Ms Binda Gokhale (CFO); Mr Stephen Thorpe (Director); Mr Johnny Marinis (Financial Controller); Mr Michael Kelly (Financial Controller); Mr Tony Perrins (Manager Procurement); Ms Melinda Chapman (Manager Community Support); Ms Jenny Wood (Coordinator Governance); Ms Doris Tehan (Executive Assistant); Ms Merryn Menjivar (Personal Assistant);

Auditor attendance: Ms Debra Robertson (Internal Audit NTT Australia Digital); Mr Martin Orozi (Internal Audit NTT Australia Digital); Mr Nick Walker (External Audit HLB Mann Judd on behalf of VAGO); Ms Donna Attard (External Audit HLB Mann Judd on behalf of VAGO);

ARC Meeting – 15 September 2021

Committee attendance: Dr Kathy Alexander (Chair); Cr Adele Hegedich (Mayor); Mr Jeff Rigby; Mr John Watson; Ms Kylie Maher; Cr Susan McIntyre; Cr Sahana Ramesh;

Councilor attendance: Cr Jasmine Hill (observer)

Management attendance: Mr Stephen Wall (CEO); Ms Binda Gokhale (CFO); Mr Stephen Thorpe (Director); Ms Natalie Walker (Director); Mr Ludo Campbell-Reid (Director); Mr Mark Ward (Chief of Staff); Mr Gavin Shields (IT Program Director); Mr Michael Kelly (Financial Controller); Mr Tony Perrins (Manager Procurement); Ms Cath Burbidge (Coordinator Risk); Ms Doris Tehan (Executive Assistant); Ms Merryn Menjivar (Personal Assistant);

Auditor attendance: Ms Debra Robertson (Internal Audit NTT Australia Digital); Mr Martin Orozi (Internal Audit NTT Australia Digital); Mr Nick Walker (External Audit HLB Mann Judd on behalf of VAGO); Ms Donna Attard (External Audit HLB Mann Judd on behalf of VAGO);

Agenda Item

FY2021

Q4 JUN

FY2122

Q1 SEPT

GOVERNANCE

Charter Responsibilities: ▪ Receive an update from the CEO on significant achievements and strategic matters which increase Committee understanding of the organisational context and enable the effective performance of their role. ▪ Undertake an annual self-assessment of Committee performance to confirm the responsibilities of this charter have been met and provide to the CEO for tabling at the next Council Meeting. ▪ Adopt a forward meeting schedule including a proposed plan for each meeting for the forthcoming year, that covers the responsibilities of this charter.

CEO Brief

 

 

Annual ARC Self-Assessment FY2020-2021

 

 

Biannual Audit and Risk Report

 

 

Governance items of note:

·     Chief Executive Officer verbal briefing is changing to a summary paper changing to a summary paper providing discussion topics and where relevant the CEO will include a briefing from the Chief Legal Counsel.

·     The Biannual Audit and Risk Report is prepared for Council following the March and September Committee meetings. It will therefore be confirmed at the June and December Committee meeting that the report has been tabled. The Inaugural report was presented to Council in June 2021.

 

Agenda Item

FY2021

Q4 JUN

FY2122

Q1 SEPT

FINANCE & PERFORMANCE

Charter Responsibilities: ▪ Monitor the annual financial and performance reporting of Wyndham City Council, and consider whether it is complete, consistent with information known to the Committee, and reflects appropriate accounting principles and policy. ▪ Review significant accounting and reporting issues, including complex or unusual transactions and areas that rely substantially on professional judgment, and recent accounting, professional and regulatory pronouncements and legislative changes, and understand their effect on financial policy management and reporting. ▪ Review the process for the consolidation of financial information of any Wyndham City Council related entities into the annual financial report. ▪ Recommend the adoption of Annual Financial and Performance Statements to Council. ▪ Monitor Councilor expenses, to ensure they are in line with policy and are an appropriate use of public funds. ▪ Monitor Chief Executive Officer credit card expenses, to ensure they are in line with policy and are an appropriate use of public funds.

CFO Brief

 

 

External Audit Scope – FY2021-2022

 

 

External Audit Interim Report FY2020-2021

 

 

Annual Financial & Performance Report FY2020-2021

 

 

Financial Management Update

 

 

Procurement Management Update

 

 

Finance & Performance items of note:

·     Chief Executive Officer verbal briefing is changing to a summary paper changing to a summary paper outlining key discussion topics.

·     Procurement Management Update report has been split from Financial Management Update to focus content deliver in the respective areas.

Agenda Item

FY2021

Q4 JUN

FY2122

Q1 SEPT

AUDIT & ASSURANCE

Charter Responsibilities: Monitor the performance audits undertaken by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office, and other relevant reports conducted by external integrity agencies, considering the implications for Wyndham City Council. Provide an opportunity for the auditors to meet with the Committee to discuss any matters that the Committee, internal auditor or external auditor believes should be discussed privately. Internal Audit: ▪ Review with management and the internal auditor the performance of the internal audit function, ensuring the charter, activities, staffing, and structure are appropriate to enable their independent review. ▪ Review and approve the annual audit plan and all major changes to the plan, including coverage of material business risks. ▪ Monitor the execution of the internal audit plan, by approving internal audit scopes, accepting internal audit reports and reviewing managements completion of agreed actions. External audit: ▪ Note the external auditor’s proposed audit scope and approach, including any reliance on internal auditor activity. ▪ Review with management and the external auditor the results of the financial audit.

Annual Internal Audit Plan (including update of 3 year strategic plan)

DRAFT

FINAL

Internal Audit Status Update

 

 

Internal Audit Scopes

 

 

Internal Audit Reports

 

 

Internal Audit Performance

 

 

Integrity Agencies Reports relevant to Wyndham City Council

 

 

Audit & Assurance items of note:

Internal Audit Recommendation Status

HIGH RISK

MEDIUM RISK

LOW RISK

TOTAL

Open actions at start of period

4

20

6

30

New actions added during period

 

1

2

3

Completed actions closed during period

-

6

6

12

Open actions at end of period

4

15

2

21

·     The Annual Internal Audit Plan has been integrated within a three year strategic audit plan including assurance mapping, reflective audit planning and assurance activity undertaken across the past year.

·     The FY2021 Internal Audit Program was closed out with Internal Audit Scope and Report documents approved for the ERP Implementation Project and Follow up of FY2021 Internal Audit Findings reviews as well as the reports for the Kindergarten Management and Financial Controls – Procure to Pay Cycle reviews.

·     The FY2021 Internal Audit Program commenced with Internal Audit Scope documents accepted for four reviews: Victorian Protective Data Security Framework (VPDSF) Health Check, Fraud and Corruption Prevention and Control, Contaminated Land Management and Development Contributions.

·     The Annual Financial Reporting information was reviewed and recommended to Council for approval.

·     The Integrity Agencies Reports relevant to Wyndham City Council identified by the Internal Auditor for management commentary included:

Outsourcing of parking fine internal reviews – a follow-up report;

Results of 2019–20 Audits: Local Government;

Maintaining Local Roads;

Investigation into how local councils respond to ratepayers in financial hardship;

Investigation into Melton City Council’s engagement of IT company; and

Corruption and integrity: Perceptions of Victorian local government employees.

Agenda Item

FY2021

Q4 JUN

FY2122

Q1 SEPT

RISK & COMPLIANCE

Charter Responsibilities Risk: ▪ Monitor and advise on the implementation of the risk framework and management of strategic risks, including consideration of the effectiveness of the key control environment and reliability of assurance activities. ▪ Review insurance coverage and claims management annually to be assured of the adequacy of the insurance program as a key mitigation for financial risk exposure. ▪ Monitor and advise on the implementation of the business continuity management system, obtaining sufficient assurance that management have an appropriate and effective system in place. Charter Responsibilities Compliance: ▪ Monitor and advise on the implementation of the enterprise compliance management system, and management of compliance obligations, including consideration of the effectiveness of the key control environment and reliability of assurance activities. ▪ Receive and review management assurances and relevant supporting evidence in relation to the systems and processes in place to monitor the effectiveness of compliance with legislation and regulations. ▪ Monitor and advise on the implementation of the fraud and corruption control management system, obtaining sufficient assurance that management have an appropriate and effective system in place. ▪ Monitor application of integrity policies and the reporting of their associated registers: Gifts, Benefits & Hospitality Policy and Conflict of Interest – Compliance, Process & Guidance Policy.

Risk Management Update

 

 

Organisational Resilience Management Review

 

 

Annual Insurance Program Review

 

 

Compliance Management Update

 

 

CEO Compliance Attestation

 

 

Special Report: IT Risk Management

 

 

Special Report: Council’s Sexual Harassment Policy Framework

 

 

Risk & Compliance items of note:

·     Risk Management Update presented strategic risk information aligned to the annual reporting cycle, covering: Financial Sustainability, Government directive, Technology Enabler & Disruptors, Community Assets & Infrastructure, Local Economic Growth and Crisis Management. Emerging risk view was presented by the Director City Operations, and the presentation of the Director City Design and Liveability as deferred.

·     The Annual Business Continuity Management review has been reframed as an Organisational Resilience Management report. This reflects the broader scope and more proactive approach adopted organizationally following experience with COVID-19.

·     Annual Insurance Program noted 11 existing policies taken out by Wyndham City have been retained.

·     Compliance Management Update presented compliance program risk information aligned to the biennual reporting cycle, covering: Health & Safety Management, Roads Management, Financial Management, Waste Management, Animal Management and Local Laws Management. The biannual report of gifts, benefits and hospitality was also presented as well as the implementation status of the Local Government Act 2020.

·     The IT Risk Management report was proposed by the acting CEO and communicated Wyndham City’s approach to the management of risk in the IT environment, providing assurance that the new quality management driven operating model being implemented will support technology service delivery into the future.

·     The Sexual Harassment Policy Framework report was requested by the Committee following discussion at the March 2021 meeting, regarding the VAGO Sexual Harassment in Local Government report, presented as part of the Integrity Agencies Reports relevant to Wyndham City Council.


 

Biannual Audit and Risk Report – October 2021

Part 2: Findings and Recommendations of the Audit and Risk Committee

Comments from the Chair:

 

This is the first Biannual Audit and Risk Report provided to Council which I am pleased to present in my role as Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee (ARC).

 

It is clear to the ARC that Council’s risk culture has matured over the course of this reporting period.  In particular, the following aspects are to be noted:

·        ARC has adopted an Audit and Risk Committee Charter which incorporates the requirements of the Local Government Act 2020;

·        The ARC annual covers off the roles and responsibilities outlined under the Charter;

·        ARC has approved a Comprehensive Risk Framework and Policy which is focused on Council’s strategic and emerging risks;

·        The ARC and Management have increased staff engagement with internal and external Audit and focused on closing management actions arising from past audits.

·        Management has improved the quality of reporting, in particular the Council’s emergency and community responses through the COVID pandemic

This reporting period also saw changes to the ARC membership with three new Councillor representatives – Cr Adele Hegadich (Mayor), Cr Susan McIntyre, Cr Sahana Ramesh and Kylie Maher appointed as new external member.

 

The ARC reviews and improves its performance by conducting an annual self-assessment. The report on the 2019/20 self-assessment was tabled at Council’s December 2020 meeting.  This process of self-assessment provides valuable insight for Committee members, Management and Councillors and informs areas of development and focus required in delivering against the Charter responsibilities. The following comments have been provided by management regarding their approach in bringing audit and risk matters to the Committee for consideration.

 

Audit:

-        Following approval of the revised Audit and Risk Committee Charter by Council in July 2020, focus shifted to improving the governance of audits and staff engagement with  the Internal Auditors. This led to endorsement of a revised Internal Audit Charter at the ARC October 2020 meeting. The supporting documents: Internal Audit Contract Management Plan and Internal Audit Quick Reference Guide were also noted at this session. An assessment of the Internal Auditor’s performance, in line with the metrics agreed in the contract management plan, was also presented at this meeting. This is the first time this assessment had been undertaken.

-        Performance of internal audits has been more actively facilitated by the risk team to improve business engagement and focus audit attention on areas of greatest risk within agreed audit objectives.

-        Management’s monitoring and reporting of internal audit actions has continued to mature across this period, including:

Revision to the structure, layout and accessibility of the ‘Pulse’ system where these actions are recorded;

Management can now self-serve to update action status information within the tool, and upload evidence of action completion;

Actions not completed by the original due date are now able to have a revised date set with agreement from the ELT member nominated as Audit Sponsor (with evidence retained);

Tracking of audit actions now includes both external financial audit actions and VAGO performance audits where WCC has been a named participant as well as internal audit actions;

ARC feedback on reporting content has led to revision of reporting formats and the inclusion of greater detail; and

An additional validation step is being introduced to review action completion and evidence retention holistically, when all actions for an audit have been completed.  The audit action will be closed in consultation with the Audit Owner and Sponsor.

Risk:

-        Enterprise risk profile content has been expanded to include the summary risk from the 21 identified compliance programs, enabling holistic view of risk while supporting improvement in compliance. A Strategic Risk meeting cycle has been established and published on the intranet to share key risk information and encourage stakeholder contribution to topics relevant to their work. Directors will be in attendance at ARC meetings on a rotating basis and speak to emerging risks in their area of responsibility. Development of strategic risk assurance activities has been the focus over the past 6 months. Meetings with all business area leadership teams have been held to identify key operational risks.  A report will shortly be reviewed by the Executive. Following that, work with identified owners and delegates will commence to develop our understanding of these risks. Mapping has occurred across the enterprise risk profile to identify gaps and will form part of the conversation about the comprehensiveness of risk mitigation strategies.

 

 


Other Reports

 

Council Meeting

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

 

File No:  

 

 

Item No: 6.5.9

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

 

 

 

Councillor Appointments to Committees

 

Summary

Each year, following the election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor Council reviews the appointment of Councillors to all committees (external and internal). Proposed appointments for the 2021/22 Council year are tabled and considered at the meeting.

Internal advisory committees are committees established by Council that provide advice to Council. Council has also created some Portfolios to help form strategies, set policy and gather community feedback. The Portfolios are supported by a Portfolio Committee consisting of community representatives and experts in their field, chaired by the relevant Councillor Portfolio holder.

External advisory committees are convened by external parties.  Council is invited to nominate Councillors (or Council officers, as appropriate) to represent Council in these advisory or decision-making governance structures.

 

Attachments

1.

Draft - 2022 External and Internal Committees List

 

 

Officers’ Declaration of Interests

Under Section 130 of the Local Government Act 2020, officers providing advice to Council must disclose any interests, including the type of interest.

 

Chief Executive Officer - Stephen Wall

In providing this advice as the CEO, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Executive Manager Corporate Affairs - Emily Keogh

In providing this advice as the Manager, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

Governance Coordinator - Jenny Wood

In providing this advice as the Author, I have no disclosable interests in this report.

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council nominate representation on internal and external advisory committees and groups for the 2021/2022 Council year, as per the attached document.

 

 

MOTION

 

Cr Sahana Ramesh / Jasmine Hill

 

That Council nominate representation on internal and external advisory committees and groups for the 2021/2022 Council year, as per the attached document.

 

(CARRIED)

 

1.      Background

Councillors were appointed to the internal and external committees and groups in 2020 at the beginning of the current council term.  They were in turn approved by council at meetings held on 23 November and 8 December 2020.  Each year the committee appointments are reviewed and updated following the election of the Mayor and Deputy Mayor.

2.      Relevant Law

Section 63 and 64 of the Local Government Act 2020 outlines the requirements of both delegated and joint delegated committees. 

3.      Discussion

At the start of the Council term all Councillors are appointed to internal and external Committees including Portfolio Committee’s.  These committee are formed to support the decision making, policy development, decision making and project management across the municipality.

Table 1:     Portfolio Committees

Council delivers a range of programs and initiatives that contribute to the delivery of the Council Plan 2021-25 and ultimately the Wyndham 2040 Community Vision. To support the attainment of Council’s strategic objectives, as described in the Council Plan 2021-25, Council creates several key advisory committees, to support some Portfolio areas

Table 2:     Externally Appointed Committees

Some Councillors are also appointed to external committees.  In some cases, they are positions not appointed by Council, but by an external body. With the exception of the MAV representative, Councillors who have been previously successfully elected / appointed as representatives of Wyndham City Council will retain these appointments.

 

The MAV is a membership association and the legislated peak body for local government in Victoria. Each member council can appoint a representative to attend the State Council meetings, exercise their council’s vote and provide regular reports to their council on their activities. Appointments for MAV representatives are made annually by each council.

Table 3:     Municipal Association of Victoria Committees

The MAV has several committees to support the policy and advocacy for the MAV and Local Government in Victoria.

Following a review of the committees, the Board resolved at its October 2020 meeting that the Human Services Committee, the Emergency Management Committee and the Professional Development Reference Group will continue subject to a review of each committee’s terms of reference.

 

To strengthen member engagement, the Transport and Infrastructure Committee, the Planning Committee, and the Environment Committee have been replaced by regular forums open to all MAV members. As a result, Councillor appointments to these committees are no longer required and these committees have been removed from the attached list of appointments.

Table 4:     Other Internal/External Committees/Organisations

Councillors are appointed to several other internal and external advisory committees to support projects, policy and decision making across the municipality.

 

Table 5:     Joint Delegated Committees

Section 63 and 64 of the Local Government Act 2020 outlines the provisions for the development of a delegated or joint delegated committee.  Currently Wyndham City Council have one delegated committee for Planning and are a member of one joint delegated committee, LeadWest.

4.      Wyndham 2040 Community Vision

·    Leadership and Participation:
The community of Wyndham City Council has said that they value being heard in matters of importance to them.  Councillors are actively involved and encourage participation from the community on a number of key advisory committee’s and groups.  Their input is valuable to Council to support the decision making across the municipality.
 

5.      Council Plan

7.3 Foster trust in Council through the implementation of effective civic leadership and responsible governance processes that ensure accountability and compliance with all legislated and statutory requirements

6.      Other Council Strategies, Plans and Policies

Not applicable

7.      Regional, State and national plans and Policies

Internal and external committees are established by Council and external bodies and organisations to support the policy, advocacy and decision making across the municipality.  Generally the committees are associated with current regional, state and national plans and policies.

8.      Financial Viability

All attendance expenses are within the current budget.

9.      Sustainability Implications

Not applicable

10.    Options

Not applicable

11.    Community Engagement

Not applicable

12.    Communication Strategy

Once adopted the appointments to internal and external committees will be communicated through internal channels to the relevant Council departments.  External organisations will be notified directly,.

13.    Innovation and Continuous Improvement

Not applicable

14.    Collaboration

Not applicable